Home   Whats On   Article

THEATRE REVIEW: Live theatre at its thrilling best through wonder of technology




IDES OF MARCH: David Morrissey as Mark Antony in Nicholas Hytner's production of William Shakespeare's 'Julius Caesar' at London's Bridge Theatre. Photo by Manuel Harlan.
IDES OF MARCH: David Morrissey as Mark Antony in Nicholas Hytner's production of William Shakespeare's 'Julius Caesar' at London's Bridge Theatre. Photo by Manuel Harlan.

An ageless political thriller that spawned immortal lines like “Beware the Ides of March” was brought thrillingly to life at South Holland Centre before Easter.

Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar was transformed into a murderous conspiracy for the present day by director Nicholas Hytner and a star-studded cast at the Bridge Theatre, London, as part of the National Theatre Live series.

With David Morrissey (The Walking Dead) and Ben Whishaw (Skyfall, Paddington) amongst the cast, the story of how Julius Caesar (David Calder, Rush) was assassinated by a gang of conspirators led by Brutus (Whishaw) and Cassius (Michelle Fairley, Game of Thrones) came vividly to life.

Credit to must go to the unjustly named supporting cast, including Adjoa Andoh (Doctor Who) who stole every scene she acted in as the hard-to-read Casca and Leila Farzad as caught-in-the middle Decius Brutus.

But this was Morrissey’s show from the moment he came on stage as a cheerleaders to lead the audience in a cover of Twisted Sister’s 1984 anthem of revolution, “We’re Not Gonna Take It”.

Shakespeare would have been proud of this unforgettable and unmissable epic.

CLASSIC CONSPIRACY: Ben Whishaw as Marcus Brutus in Nicholas Hytner's production of William Shakespeare's 'Julius Caesar' at London's Bridge Theatre. Photo by Manuel Harlan.
CLASSIC CONSPIRACY: Ben Whishaw as Marcus Brutus in Nicholas Hytner's production of William Shakespeare's 'Julius Caesar' at London's Bridge Theatre. Photo by Manuel Harlan.

Review by Winston Brown

Something rotten is the status of a top-notch show

The matter of life and death for two right characters

New approach to biblical execution divides opinion

Men at some time are masters of their fates - The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars but in ourselves that we are underlings.
Cassius, Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare


COMMENTS
()


Iliffe Media does not moderate comments. Please click here for our house rules.

People who post abusive comments about other users or those featured in articles will be banned.

Thank you. Your comment has been received and will appear on the site shortly.

 

Terms of Comments

We do not actively moderate, monitor or edit contributions to the reader comments but we may intervene and take such action as we think necessary, please click here for our house rules.

If you have any concerns over the contents on our site, please either register those concerns using the report abuse button, contact us here.

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More