THEATRE REVIEW: Live theatre at its thrilling best through wonder of technology

IDES OF MARCH: David Morrissey as Mark Antony in Nicholas Hytner's production of William Shakespeare's 'Julius Caesar' at London's Bridge Theatre.  Photo by Manuel Harlan.
IDES OF MARCH: David Morrissey as Mark Antony in Nicholas Hytner's production of William Shakespeare's 'Julius Caesar' at London's Bridge Theatre. Photo by Manuel Harlan.
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An ageless political thriller that spawned immortal lines like “Beware the Ides of March” was brought thrillingly to life at South Holland Centre before Easter.

Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar was transformed into a murderous conspiracy for the present day by director Nicholas Hytner and a star-studded cast at the Bridge Theatre, London, as part of the National Theatre Live series.

With David Morrissey (The Walking Dead) and Ben Whishaw (Skyfall, Paddington) amongst the cast, the story of how Julius Caesar (David Calder, Rush) was assassinated by a gang of conspirators led by Brutus (Whishaw) and Cassius (Michelle Fairley, Game of Thrones) came vividly to life.

Credit to must go to the unjustly named supporting cast, including Adjoa Andoh (Doctor Who) who stole every scene she acted in as the hard-to-read Casca and Leila Farzad as caught-in-the middle Decius Brutus.

But this was Morrissey’s show from the moment he came on stage as a cheerleaders to lead the audience in a cover of Twisted Sister’s 1984 anthem of revolution, “We’re Not Gonna Take It”.

Shakespeare would have been proud of this unforgettable and unmissable epic.

CLASSIC CONSPIRACY: Ben Whishaw as Marcus Brutus in Nicholas Hytner's production of William Shakespeare's 'Julius Caesar' at London's Bridge Theatre.  Photo by Manuel Harlan.

CLASSIC CONSPIRACY: Ben Whishaw as Marcus Brutus in Nicholas Hytner's production of William Shakespeare's 'Julius Caesar' at London's Bridge Theatre. Photo by Manuel Harlan.

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Cassius, Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare