World Autism Awareness Week at Spalding pre-school

Munchkins Kindergarten celebrate Autism Awareness Day with youngsters wearing onesies, looked after by Hanna Leedham, Eve Lawrence, Daisy Mitchell and Katie Bond.  Photo by Tim Wilson.
Munchkins Kindergarten celebrate Autism Awareness Day with youngsters wearing onesies, looked after by Hanna Leedham, Eve Lawrence, Daisy Mitchell and Katie Bond. Photo by Tim Wilson.
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Munchkins Kindergarten in Spalding took time out to think about people who find it hard to communicate with others through no fault of their own.

The pre-school held a series of events, including Onesie Wednesday, to celebrate World Autism Awareness Week (March 27 until April 2).

World Autism Awareness Week is an enjoyable one for 'Annabelle Hall. Photo by Tim Wilson.

World Autism Awareness Week is an enjoyable one for 'Annabelle Hall. Photo by Tim Wilson.

Onesie Wednesday was launched by the National Austistic Society (NAS) after a poll it commissioned found that nearly one in three people in the UK actually own a onesie, with more than two in five people (43%) would be willing to wear it “out and about” for a good cause.

Figures released to coincide with World Autism Awareness Day on Thursday showed that more people in the UK are aware of autism than ever before, with public awareness of the condition at over 99 per cent.

NAS chief executive Mark Lever: “World Autism Awareness Day is the most important date in our calendar as it is the one time each year when the world comes together to think about autism and how we can make the world a better place for people living with the condition.

“It is remarkable that awareness has increased so much since the NAS was set up over 50 years ago at a time when people with the condition were often written off and hidden from society.

Poppy Fisher holds a balloon from the National Autistic Society.  Photo by Tim Wilson.

Poppy Fisher holds a balloon from the National Autistic Society. Photo by Tim Wilson.

“But, as our supporters frequently tell us, there is still a long way to go before autism is fully understood and people with the condition are able to participate fully in their communities.

“All too often we still hear stories of families experiencing judgemental attitudes or individuals facing isolation due to misunderstandings around autism.

“Autism can have a profound impact on an individual and their family, but the right understanding and support can make all the difference and ensure that they live full lives as part of their local communities.”

Holding balloons and wearing onesies are Teagan Wakeley, Poppy Fisher, Kai Wetherhill and Sophie Harvey.  Photo by Tim Wilson.

Holding balloons and wearing onesies are Teagan Wakeley, Poppy Fisher, Kai Wetherhill and Sophie Harvey. Photo by Tim Wilson.