Flying Scotsman is coming to Spalding area - confirmed

LANDMARK VISIT: The Flying Scotsman at Hawthorn Bank level crossing, Spalding, during its last visit to the area in August 2001. Photo by David Mead.
LANDMARK VISIT: The Flying Scotsman at Hawthorn Bank level crossing, Spalding, during its last visit to the area in August 2001. Photo by David Mead.
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The world’s most famous steam locomotive is on its way to Spalding – but it will only be a Flying visit.

For the first time in nearly 15 years, train enthusiasts in Spalding will be able to see the Flying Scotsman close-up when it speeds through the area on Saturday, June 18 at about 7pm.

The visit will be part of a special White Rose journey, chartered by The Railway Touring Company of King’s Lynn, from York to London King’s Cross.

Spalding rail enthusiast David Mead said: “Before the First World War, the Great Northern Railway (GNR) Company realised that its locomotive fleet was becoming hard-pressed to survive due to increasing train lengths and the weight of them.

“But because of The Great War from 1914 to 1918, the larger Pacific locomotives did not emerge until 1922.

“Compared to the Atlantic locomotives, Pacifics were massive machines and following a series of successful trials with them, GNR authorised the building of another ten locomotives.

We understand people are excited about seeing the Flying Scotsman’s return and we want them to have a great day out

Chief inspector David Oram, British Transport Police

“The first one to emerge from the Doncaster Locomotive Works was the No.1272 Flying Scotsman in January 1923, at the same time as GNR had been absorbed into the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER).

“But it was later when The Flying Scotsman was renumbered 4472 and it was credited with the first officially-authenticated 100mph locomotive speed achieved in Lincolnshire at Little Bytham.”

Interest in The Flying Scotsman has soared since its return to the electrified East Coast Main Line after a ten-year, £4.2 million refurbishment by the National Railway Museum, York.

Crowds of people flocked to see the locomotive during its inaugural journey from London King’s Cross to York in February, with thousands of spectators lining the route.

However, the day was marred in parts by several dangerous acts of trespassing where members of the public were seen walking along the tracks and taking photographs of the locomotive, while other trains continued to pass on lines directly opposite.

Chief inspector David Oram from the British Transport Police said: “We understand people are excited about seeing the Flying Scotsman’s return and we want them to have a great day out.

“But the railway is a hazardous environment and we would urge people to use safe vantage points to view and take pictures of the train, while staying clear of the line.

“Our priority is the safety of the public, as well as passengers viewing and travelling on the train.

“The railway is a hazardous environment and we would urge people not to be tempted to risk their lives, and the lives of others, by trespassing on the tracks.

“This is not only extremely dangerous, and can result in the train’s journey being delayed, but it is an offence for which the offender risks being brought before the courts, given a fine of £1,000 and a criminal record.

“Where people are found to be trespassing, we will take proportionate and necessary action against them.”

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