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Lincolnshire set to enjoy the sunniest and driest spring on record according to the Met Office




Lincolnshire is basking in the sunniest and driest spring in more than 90 years.

With blue skies and temperatures in the low to mid-20s set to remain for the rest of the week, it appears this year will be the best since records began way back in 1929.

According to the Met Office, we have enjoyed more than 624 hours of sunshine in the last three months - that's 37 per cent above average.

Sunshine (13162452)
Sunshine (13162452)

And with the season not ending until Sunday, the last day of May, it is guaranteed the previous record set in 1990 will be beaten.

Just over 30 years ago, 606.6 hours of sunshine was recorded in the county, which surpassed the previous best year, 1948 when we basked in 583.5 hours of sunshine.

Forecasters says it's all down to high pressure which has been a dominant weather feature for much of the spring period, leading to long spells of dry and settled weather for most of the country.

That good weather will continue for the rest of this week and over the weekend.

While the dry and bright conditions have probably been welcomed by parents with children off school during lockdown, it might not have been such good news for gardeners looking to maintain their spring blooms.

Rainfall levels are significantly down on what's normally expected for this time of year.

Since the start of March, Lincolnshire has only had 27 per cent of the average rainfall we would normally get during the season with a mere 37.2mm.

That surpasses the previous driest spring on record in 2011 when 41.5mm of rain fell in the county.

While the good weather has enabled us to get out for our daily exercise, it has also led to many heading to the coast in recent days and causing concerns over rubbish and breaking social distancing guidelines.

With spring ending this weekend it looks like the summer will get off to just as bright a start, but the occasional thunderstorm can't be ruled out.

A long range forecast from the Met Office suggests Lincolnshire will continue to enjoy more warm temperatures throughout June with any cloud and rain being confined to the north of the country.

The top 5 driest Mays on record (records dating back to 1862) for Lincolnshire are as follows:

1970 when 9.6mm of rainfall was recorded

1935 when 11.1mm of rainfall was recorded

1991 when 12.2mm of rainfall was recorded

1959 when 12.4mm of rainfall was recorded

1989 when 13.7mm of rainfall was recorded

The top 5 driest Springs on record (records dating back to 1862) for Lincolnshire are as follows:

2011 when 41.5mm of rainfall was recorded

1893 when 47.4mm of rainfall was recorded

1929 when 53.8mm of rainfall was recorded

1990 when 55.1mm of rainfall was recorded

1974 when 60.5mm of rainfall was recorded

The top 5 sunniest Mays on record (records dating back to 1929) for Lincolnshire are as follows:

1989 when 279.4 hours of sunshine was recorded

2018 when 272.7 hours of sunshine was recorded

1943 when 259.5 hours of sunshine was recorded

1992 when 254.5 hours of sunshine was recorded

1983 when 251.3 hours of sunshine was recorded

The top 5 sunniest Springs on record (records dating back to 1929) for Lincolnshire are as follows:

1990 when 606.6 hours of sunshine was recorded

1948 when 583.5 hours of sunshine was recorded

2003 when 573.4 hours of sunshine was recorded

2010 when 563.7 hours of sunshine was recorded

2011 when 562.6 hours of sunshine was recorded

Luke Miall, a meteorologist at the Met Office, said the decent weather looks set to continue: "It does look like as we go into the beginning of summer we are going to continue to see this fine weather, certainly for the first few days of June.

"There are some signs that we are looking at some spells of high pressure throughout the month of June as well, so that does give us the suggestion that we could see some further fine and fairly warm weather.

"But, looking further ahead there is still the potential that we could see more unsettled spells of weather at times, so this particular event can’t be directly related to the summer weather events that we’ll see."

Despite below average rainfall he doesn't think gardeners need to be worried about the prospect of a hosepipe ban anytime soon. He added: "We had a very wet autumn and winter and that’s the period of time when we usually see the recharge to our rivers and reservoirs, so because of that period there isn’t too much concern at the moment despite the fact we’ve had a fairly dry three months.

"I think if this dry weather were to continue through the summer and into next autumn then there may be more concerns later on but at this stage we’re just seeing a kind of swing really, we’ve gone from very wet to very dry so it’s almost averaging out at the moment."



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