WEEKEND WEB: Spalding Guardian letters

Trisha Elding took this picture in Holbeach at sunset late last summer.

YOur views on Brexit, rural crimes and new homes... plus Thought For THe Week

A New Year’s message from UKIP

Sonia Metcalf took this picture of sunset at Vernatts Drain

We are now looking at a new year, so let’s hope it brings better news.

My own party has already started changing, though it’s an ongoing process, ready to deal with the new problems Brexit brings and the challenges it offers and to take the maximum advantage of escaping from the EU and it’s iron rule... and iron it’s been.

For many years every single time the UK has objected to new EU rules and laws, we have been outvoted and overruled. That has to stop and must not be part of our new relationship with them or of the Brexit negotiations. Mrs May please take note, you’re not doing very well so far.

The election of our new leader, Henry Bolton OBE, averted a right wing take over and most of our more “strident” members have left us, though we were always more interested in right and wrong than Right and Left.

UKIP love Europe and Europeans, we want co-operation and a good relationship with our neighbours as well as with the rest of the much wider world.

We need to trade with everyone, not just with the crumbling artificial construct of an EU superstate run by an unelected elite. We want stability and full equal rights for all existing legal migrant communities, hand in hand with proper border control based on a flexible points system.

Brexit must in future 
allow us to choose who comes to live here and how many, not Brussels. Those who do move here must accept basic British social values, as most of them already do willingly. We need to be a united nation, not one divided by class, race, origin or privilege and that requires a lot of work.

Henry has said he wishes elected UKIP members to put all the people they represent before the national party, it’s something our local party has done for ages and will continue to do.

I had hoped that the local Labour party would do more to take on the role of speaking for the minority who do not blindly support the established parties but they remain deeply divided at a national level and continue to stick to their dangerous and divisive party line, promising to deliver impossible aims in order to mislead and fool people.

Clearly UKIP are needed more than ever as a catalyst for change.

Above all, politics and politicians need to be honest, avoiding spin and using simple language to explain policies and challanging their own parties, government and administrations when necessary.

Post-Brexit, this will 
become even more important, there will no longer be the long grass in Brussels to hide bad policy, worse decisions and the unforeseen consequences that come with such mistakes. Whatever happens, 2018 is going to be an interesting year for us all and Brexit will continue to dominate the headlines. We made the right decision during the referendum and I hope we will now make the most of it. It’s up to us all to make it work and that’s much more important than party loyalty. During 2018 everyone needs to be positive, there will be no new referendum, we are, one way or another, fully committed to leaving the EU and it is the best opportunity to re-invent ourselves we’ve had for over 40 years.

I hope even Remainers will cease trying to change history and talk up our nation and our future. It has the potential to be very bright indeed.

Personally, I wish to spend most of my own time on local matters, not national ones. I try my best to be politically impartial on such local issues, though no doubt wider problems will crop up sometimes.

I’ll continue to do all I can, using whatever tools are at my disposal, for our town and the wider Parish of Holbech, which is set to change greatly in the near to mid future. It’s something we need to prepare for as best we can.

Paul Foyster

Chairman

UKIP South Holland & the Deepings

The best gifts can’t be wrapped

I want to take the opportunity to thank local Alzheimer’s Society supporters who united against dementia last year by fundraising, campaigning and volunteering.

With 11,000 people with dementia in Lincolnshire, the need to unite in the fight against dementia has never been more pressing.

From volunteering with Alzheimer’s Society’s new Side by Side service, joining one of our fundraising events or writing to your local MP, there are many ways people can get involved to help beat dementia in 2018.

The best gifts can’t be wrapped so whether you give an hour, a day or more, please visit alzheimers.org.uk/
getinvolved to find out how you can unite against dementia.

Nasim Minhas

Alzheimer’s Society Lincolnshire operations manager

Statistics do not always reveal the truth

Statistics don’t always paint the true picture, especially when they relate to rural crime.

Before beleaguered farmers crack open the Prosecco at the news of fewer reported incidents of hare coursing in South Holland.

And before the police continue to post self-satisfied pictures of senior officers involved in Operation Galileo, they should ponder the following: are hare coursing episodes going unreported for fear of ever more violent reprisals?

And are the criminals wising up to the activities of those who would stop their activities?

If the police have drone technology at their disposal, doubtless the coursers do too, enabling them to relay the position of police vehicles and make a hasty exit if they get too close.

Chivers

via email

Does this mean we’re no longer a flood risk?

I read your report (200 new homes planned for Long Sutton ) with interest.

I think that I understand the builder’s desire for permission to build. I do question the need for these properties to be built in the first place, I was not aware of any shortage of houses for sale in this area. Further, where are the work positions that are available?

Working on a 2.5 person occupation of the properties, a further 500 people would come into the area. The medical centre would seem to be over burdened with patients at the moment. Can the local schools absorb another 100 chilldren?

In my view the traffic plan for the town would require a detailed independent review

Finally, I seem to recall that concern had been expressed regarding the town being in the flood area in the future. It would give some peace of mind if we can be assured that this is no longer considered correct!

Russell Martin

via email

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

Well, that’s it then, Christmas is over, and we have seen the New Year in.

Often we overdo our eating during the Christmas season and then plan to get healthier in the new year. Go on a diet, get more exercise.

Good intentions often hard to keep as we get back to our usual habits.

People who did stick with their plan were the wise men whose arrival we remember on January 6, a Christian feast day called Epiphany.

They had seen a star and felt they had to follow it. Even though their journey could have taken many months they didn’t give up.

And it was all worth while. As they found Jesus and gave him their gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh, the Bible tells us they were overjoyed as they worshipped the new born king.

Although this Christmas season is ending, we needn’t be sad to take down our tinsel and baubles.

After all, we can’t live with these decorations all year. It’s good to start afresh and look forward.

May we journey into 2018 with the hope and expectation of those wise men and find that same happiness.

May everyone enjoy a happy and blessed 2018.

Pat Wilson

St Paul’s Church

Spalding

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