Home   News   Article

Spalding school gets the gift of life-saving equipment




School administrator Claire Redford (far right, back row), with (back) head of school Claire Moore, Jamie and teaching assistant Shannon Chambers. Front: Coun Francis Biggadike, Noah, Kaitlin, Lilly-Mae and and Coun Angela Newton. (SG080118-101TW)
School administrator Claire Redford (far right, back row), with (back) head of school Claire Moore, Jamie and teaching assistant Shannon Chambers. Front: Coun Francis Biggadike, Noah, Kaitlin, Lilly-Mae and and Coun Angela Newton. (SG080118-101TW)

Staff and children at the Garth Special School in Spalding have received the gift of potentially life-saving kit.

It comes after school administrator Claire Redford completed her Paediatric First Aid Training last year.

During the training, she said that the life-saving value of having a defibrillator in school was stressed.

After a discussion in school, Claire approached South Holland District Councillor Sally Slade requesting help with raising funds to purchase a defibrillator.

Claire said: “Sally approached her fellow local district counsellors who were only too willing to support the school with the purchase. They raised £512.97.

“Thanks to their help we were able to obtain a discounted defibrillator through the NHS Supply Chain.

“During First Aid training it has become clear that CPR (Cardiopulmonary resuscitation) alone can save a life but together with a defibrillator the chances of saving a life is far greater.

“Having a defibrillator in school is reassuring for staff and pupils. I would rather have a defibrillator that is never used than not have one at all.”

○ A defibrillator is a device that gives a high energy electric shock to the heart through the chest wall to someone who is in cardiac arrest.

This high energy shock is called defibrillation, and it’s an essential life saving step in the chain of survival.

There are a number of defibrillators now accessible in the district. In the case of coming across someone who has had a cardiac arrest, the British Heart Foundation says that it is vital to call 999 and start CPR.

The emergency service will advise if there is a defibrillator nearby.

SEE ALSO:

Mountain trek raised £800 for defibrillator

Defibrillator and dementia night in Gedney Dyke



COMMENTS
()


Iliffe Media does not moderate comments. Please click here for our house rules.

People who post abusive comments about other users or those featured in articles will be banned.

Thank you. Your comment has been received and will appear on the site shortly.

 

Terms of Comments

We do not actively moderate, monitor or edit contributions to the reader comments but we may intervene and take such action as we think necessary, please click here for our house rules.

If you have any concerns over the contents on our site, please either register those concerns using the report abuse button, contact us here.

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More