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Election fever grips Spalding Grammar School




Election fever is gripping Spalding Grammar School this week as four political parties seek to win students' hearts, minds and votes.

Parliament Week sees Year 13 politics students representing parties called Tomorrow, Progress, Transform and Vision.

Party leaders and representatives unveiled their key policies to a packed assembly on Monday.

Party leaders and supporters Joe Seth, Anete Murniece, William Hayes, Becca Long, Harry Padoan, Hannah Catterall, Franklin Stokes, Neave Shaw, Joe Gill and Jack Braginton
Party leaders and supporters Joe Seth, Anete Murniece, William Hayes, Becca Long, Harry Padoan, Hannah Catterall, Franklin Stokes, Neave Shaw, Joe Gill and Jack Braginton

A headline policy for Tomorrow is "allocating two police officers on the street in every community in the country".

Party leader Harry Padoan and Becca Long outlined their "modern approach" to politics.

Harry spoke about the 57 million children worldwide who don't go to primary school, with more girls than boys missing out on education.

He said: "We want to start a movement against inequality and get one million more girls into school across the world."

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Party leaders and supporters Joe Seth, Anete Murniece, William Hayes, Becca Long, Harry Padoan, Hannah Catterall, Franklin Stokes, Neave Shaw, Joe Gill and Jack Braginton Head of law and politics Alexandra Dearing. (121118-12) Progress party leader Franklin Stokes and supporter Joe Gill with his neon, flashing glasses An attentive audience as pupils listen to the speeches at assembly. Right, Anete Murniece and William Hayes speak for the Vision party Anete Murniece and William Hayes for Vision. (121118-16) Anete Murniece with Vision party leader William Hayes. (121118-17) Neave Shaw and Hannah Catterall speak about Transform’s policies. (121118-18) Students listen to the arguments of politics students at Spalding Grammar School. (121118-19) Some of the students in the special assembly. (121118-20) Listening to the policies spelled out by competing parties. (121118-22) Key policies from Transform. A reminder of the struggle for women’s suffrage. One of the thought-provoking images presented to the assembly. One of the thought-provoking images presented to the assembly.

One of the main policies for Progress is "ending violence against women and girls in the UK".

Party leader Franklin Stokes and Joe Gill also spoke about the need to remove tuition fees and there was a radical step for healthcare policy, making online consultation with GPs available 24 hours a day.

One of Vision's main policies is "ensuring prisoners who are sentenced to life stay in prison for life".

Party leader William Hayes and Anete Murniece spoke about the need for a stronger stance on law and order as well as the need to be fierce in defence of the gentle.

William said: "We need a clear vision of how to make this country a stronger and safer place to exist."

One of Transform's headline policies is "end all stop and search powers for police," because only 10 per cent of one million searches lead to arrest and black people are six times more likely to be stopped.

Party leader Neave Shaw and supporter Hannah Catterall had an education policy involving raising the school starting age to eight years, pointing out that children in Finland start school at seven and are third in the world for reading, maths and science.

As well as looking at policies, prospective voters will be assessed on whether they judged candidates on appearance.

Joe Gill took that test to an extreme by adopting some neon, flashing specs for his address.

Teacher Alexandra Dearing, the school's head of law and politics, said the quirkier aspects of the presentations were there to see whether it makes any difference to how students vote.

* See next week's Spalding Guardian for election results!



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