Spalding branch of the Royal Naval Association hold D-Day service

The Royal Naval Association D-Day Commemoration at the war memorial in Ayscoughfee Gardens.
The Royal Naval Association D-Day Commemoration at the war memorial in Ayscoughfee Gardens.
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Spalding branch of the Royal Naval Association (RNA) and their guests marked the 73rd anniversary of D-Day with a service at the war memorial in Ayscoughfee Gardens.

Tuesday’s commemoration of one of the most significant dates in the Second World War was well supported by ex-service organisations, South Holland district councillors and members of the public.

The service was conducted by the RNA branch padre, Capt. Paul Whitely, and homages were recited as ex-service standards were lowered in tribute to the fallen.

A wreath was laid by the RNA branch chairman, shipmate Keith Crawford MBE.

District council vice chairman Coun Harry Drury said: “I was privileged and honoured to spend a couple of hours with this admiral group of heroes this morning at the Royal Naval Association D-Day Service at the war memorial in Ayscoughfee Gardens, while representing South Holland District Council.

“The most enjoyable part of the day for me was talking to the veterans in attendance from the various British forces about their experiences while serving their country and their commitment to one another and to their friends and colleagues they lost whilst fighting for our country and freedom.

“Sometimes, taking a little time out of the busy and stressful life we live to listen and appreciate what our soldiers do for us really helps put life into perspective.”

The RNA has thanked all service personnel, civic dignitaries and members of the public who supported the annual service.

Special thanks went to the Merchant Navy whose efforts are often forgotten and their casualty count was very large as the Allied Forces mounted one of the largest amphibious military assaults in history.

Codenamed Operation Overlord, the battle began on June 6, 1944 – known as D-Day – and it involved 156,000 British, American and Canadian troops.