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Sutton Bridge farmer: 'Kitchen was dumped on our land'




Farmers are picking up a huge financial burden from criminals fly-tipping waste in the countryside.

While taxpayers meet the eye-watering cost of fly-tipped waste on public land, farmers are left to pick up the tab if it’s on their land.

And the cost is averaging out at £1,000 for each incident, according to leading insurance brokers.

Father and son farmers Michael and Simon Booth, from Sutton Bridge, regularly clear fly-tipped waste from their holding – which lies close to the spot where two tonnes of soil and turf were dumped in a gateway at Guy’s Head Road.

Stephen Penn dumped nearly two tonnes of soil and turf at Guy's Head Road, near Sutton Bridge.
Stephen Penn dumped nearly two tonnes of soil and turf at Guy's Head Road, near Sutton Bridge.

The man who dumped the waste in the gateway, Stephen Penn, of Garnsgate, Long Sutton, was prosecuted by South Holland District Council, and ordered to pay a total of £4,274.86 in fines and court costs.

Details of the case were released on Tuesday along with news that Wisbech man Shaun Harvey was ordered to pay a total of £2,272.13 for dumping a large load of tree cuttings at West Drove South, Gedney Hill.

Shaun Harvey dumped tree cuttings at Gedney Hill.
Shaun Harvey dumped tree cuttings at Gedney Hill.

Both incidents were witnessed by residents who reported what they had seen.

Michael Booth said he was very pleased the two men had been caught and with the penalties imposed by the courts.

He said: “That will make them think twice.”

The Booths regularly clear fly-tipped waste from their farm.

“Not last Christmas but the Christmas before, I had a whole kitchen deposited off the Guy’s Head bank,” he said. “It was all smashed up – it was in bits.”

He took the tractor and trailer to clear up the mess and says the chief cost was in time lost from the working day.

The Farmers and Mercantile Insurance Brokers (FMIB) say more than 200 agricultural fly-tipping incidents were reported to councils across the East Midlands last year.

But they also say the true scale of the fly-tipping epidemic is not reflected in the figures.

The FMIB’s Will Kendrick points out that some incidents involve asbestos, clinical waste and chemical and fuel waste.

Mr Kendrick said: “So, farmers not only have to fork out for clean-up costs, but also have to worry about the danger it poses to themselves, their workers, their animals and their land.

“These fly-tippers, both thoughtless individuals and unscrupulous ‘waste businesses’, don’t care that their irresponsible actions could lead to farmers being prosecuted under the Environmental Protection Act 1990.”

Our previous stories include:

Fly-tippers ordered to pay thousands for dumping waste in South Holland

Shock find of pig's head in ditch at Sutton Bridge

Vandalism and fly-tipping at Spalding's Vernatts Drain Nature Reserve is answered by launch of new bird box scheme

Spalding 'tip' turned away people disposing of green waste

Fly-tippers: Spalding Facebook group are watching you

New flytipping group target Spalding grot spot



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