Plea from Gosberton: ‘Cut volume and speed of traffic before we see someone killed’

A view that could kill? Drivers turning into Gosberton see this view of the T-junction and some don't realise they must drive around the left bend before they can turn into the correct lane to enter the village. ANL-160104-104116001
A view that could kill? Drivers turning into Gosberton see this view of the T-junction and some don't realise they must drive around the left bend before they can turn into the correct lane to enter the village. ANL-160104-104116001
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Pedestrian crossings and school patrols are among traffic calming “demands” that parish councillors want to see introduced in Gosberton, Gosberton Risegate and Gosberton Clough.

At a public meeting on Wednesday parish councillors and residents voiced concerns about high volumes of traffic, heavy lorries turning Gosberton High Street into a rat run as transport firms take the shortest route from the A16 to the A52 and fears there is a serious accident waiting to happen at high risk spots, including two T-junctions at Gosberton.

We are very concerned that sooner or later we are going to have a very serious accident. We have already had the little boy who was clipped by a car just before Christmas – thankfully it wasn’t as serious as it could have been.

Parish councillor Barry Waterland

Parish councillor Barry Waterland said an official five-day traffic survey outside an address on High Street, Gosberton, showed 29,684 vehicles used the road in that time, including 1,327 lorries.

He said: “When I got the phone call from Lincolnshire Road Safety Partnership, I could not believe it. It was nearly double what I had guessed it to be”.

The meeting heard the actual number of vehicles using the road during the working week is likely to be far higher as two survey days fell at the weekend.

Coun Waterland said 42-tonne lorries “are going day and night” through a village where a lot of the property is old and the fronts of homes are close to a road that wasn’t built for the number and types of vehicles using it.

He said: “We are very concerned that sooner or later we are going to have a very serious accident. We have already had the little boy who was clipped by a car just before Christmas – thankfully it wasn’t as serious as it could have been.”

The boy was hit by a vehicle wing mirror while on his way to Gosberton Academy in mid-November and it prompted head Sarah Gray to question whether the “quite confusing” road markings outside the school should be changed and a “proper crossing installed”.

Playgroup leader Jane Houghton asked then: “We’d love to have a pedestrian crossing on High Street but is it going to take a really serious accident or a child being killed for something to happen?”

Parish council chairman John Clark told Wednesday’s public meeting the parish council is spending £4,000 on a speed detection device, which will be moved from site to site and record data that can be downloaded.

Coun Clark urged residents to sign a petition what urges “our leaders to act now to put traffic calming measures in our villages”.

It says “we demand that traffic calming measures are installed as a matter of urgency” along with pedestrian crossings and school patrols “to ensure the safety of our children and indeed all of our residents who are in danger of being involved in a serious accident due to the high volumes of traffic”.

Some attending questioned whether the T-junction at the top of High Street could be replaced by a roundabout to end the catalogue of near-misses with drivers coming from the A17 direction mistaking an exit lane for an entry lane. One man said there had been numerous accidents at the nearby Belchmire Lane T-junction, which was “not acceptable outside a busy school”.