Home   News   Article

Subscribe Now

Sutton Bridge man's life saved by walking football team mates after collapse during game



More news, no ads

LEARN MORE


A football manager has stressed the importance of all clubs having defibrillators after one was used to save the life of one of his players this morning (Sunday).

Peterborough League champions Wisbech Town Walking Football Club were playing a friendly against Spalding-based South Lincs Steelers when 56-year-old Paul Murray collapsed during a game at around 11.15am.

As his fellow Wisbech players tried to bring him round, Paul stopped breathing and lost his pulse. Steve Wyness, the club's fastest runner, was sent to get the defibrillator and manager Jonny Pearce used the machine while another player, Steve Smith - who works in a hospital A&E department – administered First Aid.

Paul Murray pictured with the Peterborough & District Walking Football League trophy (50236507)
Paul Murray pictured with the Peterborough & District Walking Football League trophy (50236507)

They had brought Sutton Bridge man Paul round by the time emergency services arrived and Jonny says the teaching assistant was sitting up and chatting in the ambulance and is now doing well in hospital.

Jonny told the Citizen: "It was really scary and the way the players reacted certainly saved Paul’s life.

"I cannot stress enough how important defib machines are and if your club hasn’t got one, then get the money together and buy one. You will never know when you're going to need it.

Paul Murray (far left) with teammates and manager Jonny Pearce (second left) after winning the Peterborough & District Walking Football League (50236510)
Paul Murray (far left) with teammates and manager Jonny Pearce (second left) after winning the Peterborough & District Walking Football League (50236510)

"Myself and everyone at the club would like to wish Paul a speedy and safe recovery."

Wisbech Town FC secretary Spenny Larham said the club had been gifted the defib machine by an anonymous donor a few years ago. However, the incident involving Danish international Christian Eriksen in June had spurred them to service it and put in new batteries.

Spenny, who lives in a house at the Lynn Road ground, said: "We obviously hadn't had any need for the machine during Covid, but after the Eriksen incident, we made sure it was in good condition and ready to use."

He added: "I was sitting watching TV with my partner Karen when all the emergency services arrived. I am so pleased that we as a club made sure the machine was ready to use in such an emergency."



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More