No alcohol to be served after 9pm

Cutting from the Lincolnshire, Boston and Spalding Free Press, August 10, 1915 ANL-150708-110738001
Cutting from the Lincolnshire, Boston and Spalding Free Press, August 10, 1915 ANL-150708-110738001
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The sale of alcohol in pubs and clubs was the major talking point in south Lincolnshire 100 years ago today.

At a meeting of Spalding Magistrates it was decided to put the town’s six clubs under the same restrictions as pubs 
after a military ruling passed the previous week.

The Intoxicating Licquor Temporary Restrictions Act of 1915 stopped pubs from serving alcohol after 9pm and gave magistrates the powers to make the same restrictions in clubs.

Those affected were Spalding Constitutional Club, Spalding Club, Spalding Masonic Club, Long Sutton Constitutional Club, Long Sutton Club and Sutton Bridge Constitutional Club.

The meeting had been held at the request of the Chief Constable of Lincolnshire.

Chairman Mr F Howard explained the order had come from the military and was to “maintain order and suppress drunkenness”.

It was made clear that 
licensed premises could be kept open to the usual time but no intoxicating licquor was to be sold after 9pm.

Clerk Mr R Merry said: “A person has a right to demand refreshment after this time and has a case against a landlord who declines to supply such refreshment, as long as no intoxicants are asked for.”

He added: “I understand the local Licensed Victuallers’ Association are going to meet to discuss whether their premises shall be closed at 9pm completely.”

Committee member Mr R Royce added that travellers had no privileges on licensed premises.

He said (to shouts of ‘hear, hear’): “I think it is manifestly unfair for any one section of the community to have privileges over another.

“I also consider it somewhat playing with the matter to keep the places open.”

Serving restrictions were ordered to be put into force forthwith.