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Could new alternative energy facility take in waste from South Holland?




Proposals for a new 'alternative energy facility' that aims to turn black bag waste into renewable fuel could reach out to South Holland.

A consultation process is currently under way on the Boston Alternative Energy Facility (BAEF), which has been proposed for development at the Riverside Industrial Estate in Boston, adjacent to the Haven River.

The plant, should it be built, will take in a fuel (or 'feedstock'), called refuse derived fuel (RDF).

The proposed new alternative energy facility could take in black bin waste from all over the UK, including South Holland. Stock image.
The proposed new alternative energy facility could take in black bin waste from all over the UK, including South Holland. Stock image.

It will then use a process known as 'gasification' to generate power which could benefit more than 185,000 households.

That's equivalent to more than 60% of the households in Lincolnshire, says the BAEF.

RDF is made from non-recyclable waste and the plant could take it in from all over the UK. It will reach the site by ship - baled and transported from various ports.

It aims to deal with waste that is currently being exported; or being sent to landfill, so will not affect existing UK 'Energy from Waste' facilities, added a spokesperson for the BAEF.

This graphic, from information supplied by the Boston Alternative Energy Facility, shows how it could work. (6584856)
This graphic, from information supplied by the Boston Alternative Energy Facility, shows how it could work. (6584856)

The facility will also have to comply with strict criteria required by the EU Industrial Emissions Directive. This ensures that any contaminants in gases from the plant are treated and removed, so that exhaust gases are ‘acceptable in terms of emission limits’.

Asked whether the plant could take in waste from South Holland, Coun Roger Gambba-Jones, portfolio holder for Place for the district council, said: "The final decision would be with the county council."

But Coun Gambba-Jones, who is also vice-chairman of the Lincolnshire Waste Partnership, added that he would be watching the plans with interest.

Coun Eddy Poll, chairman of Lincolnshire Waste Partnership and portfolio holder for Commercial and Environmental Management for the county council, . (4293585)
Coun Eddy Poll, chairman of Lincolnshire Waste Partnership and portfolio holder for Commercial and Environmental Management for the county council, . (4293585)

Coun Eddy Poll, chairman of Lincolnshire Waste Partnership and portfolio holder for Commercial and Environmental Management for the county council, agreed it was early days.

"It is a sort of exciting new technology," he said. "It could be used in addition to the waste plant at North Hykeham. I will be keeping an eye on the progress."

He added that he has concerns over the amount of commercial waste we produce as a country.

The facility will have to comply with strict criteria to ensure that any contaminants in gases from the plant are treated and removed, so that the exhaust gases are 'acceptable in terms of emission limits'.

Currently, much of our black bag waste goes to the Energy from Waste plant at North Hykeham where it is converted into electricity and fed back into the National Grid.

Surveys are being completed on how construction of the proposed new plant will be carried out to minimise any environmental impact, plus any effects on wildlife and ecology.

Coun Roger Gambba-Jones, vice chairman of Lincolnshire Waste Partnership, and portfolio holder for Place for South Holland District Council. (5647284)
Coun Roger Gambba-Jones, vice chairman of Lincolnshire Waste Partnership, and portfolio holder for Place for South Holland District Council. (5647284)

A second phase of consultations are due to be carried out next month (February), with public information days to be announced. An application for a Development Consent Order (DCO) will then need to be made and any final decision for consent will be made by the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

The process could take 18 months or more from acceptance of the DCO application to a decision; and a further three years to construct and commission following approval.

More information on the project can be found at www.bostonaef.co.uk

  • What do you think? Email our editor at jeremy.ransome@iliffepublishing.co.uk


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