Long Sutton’s Alice is dancing on the table

Alice Bates (front) with sister Abigail. Also pictured are Christine Perkins, from East Elloe Lions, Alices mum, Charlotte, and Lions Roy Perkins, David Gordon and Steve Kattner. SG140417-101TW
Alice Bates (front) with sister Abigail. Also pictured are Christine Perkins, from East Elloe Lions, Alices mum, Charlotte, and Lions Roy Perkins, David Gordon and Steve Kattner. SG140417-101TW
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Dancing on the table is a new “sport” for Long Sutton cerebral palsy sufferer Alice Bates (10).

East Elloe Lions made it possible by buying four stacking therapy tables, in graduated sizes – desperately needed equipment to help Alice maintain her health and boost her physical capabilities.

Alice’s mum, Charlotte, says: “Alice loves them. She can practice high kneeling, low kneeling, box sitting, using a footstall, standing at a table, sitting at a table, walking upstairs, walking downstairs, side stepping and, Alice’s favourite, dancing on the table.

“I’m certain our physio will find even more uses when he visits.

“I’d really like to thank all of our local Lions members.

“This is a huge addition to our therapy equipment and will really open up Alice’s opportunities to incorporate therapy and play.”

The tables have brightly coloured tops, making them visually attractive to Alice, and they have really fired her imagination.

Charlotte explained: “She’s staged ‘Strictly Come Dancing’ in the lodge using the tables as 1st, 2nd and 3rd place boxes to present the winners with their pretend trophies.”

The tables are inside Alice’s therapy playroom, a wood-built lodge, which was bought some weeks ago as a result of public contributions to the Lincolnshire Free Press Ten for 10 Appeal.

Charlotte said: “This is exactly what we hoped for when we designed this special space for Alice and Alice’s use of this latest equipment highlights just how well it has worked.

“Alice is finding physiotherapy much more fun now and this is making the time spent on it more productive.

• As a premature baby Alice Bates was lucky to survive a brain haemorrhage and a stroke.

Later she was diagnosed with cerebral palsy and then came the onset of epilepsy and seizures.

Alice has had many bouts of surgery, including an operation last summer to lengthen her hamstrings, followed by painful rehabilitation exercises.

Health problems have seen Alice lose the ability to swallow liquids, which means she must have a tube in her tummy, and she must take a string of medications.

Alice celebrated her tenth birthday on February 3, when Free Press readers and the whole South Holland community rallied round to help her ten dearest wishes come true.