Long Sutton firefighters in joint emergency team nominated for national award

Long Sutton firefighters Tony Redzia, Simon Darlow, Darren Goult, Will Kirkham and watch manager Richard King.  Photo by Tim Wilson.
Long Sutton firefighters Tony Redzia, Simon Darlow, Darren Goult, Will Kirkham and watch manager Richard King. Photo by Tim Wilson.
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A life-saving alliance between firefighters, paramedics and volunteer first-aiders in Lincolnshire is in the running for a national award.

Lincolnshire Fire and Rescue, including crews based in Long Sutton, East Midlands Ambulance Service (EMAS) and LIVES (Lincolnshire Integrated Voluntary Emergency Service) First Responders have been shortlisted for Health Service Journal Value in Healthcare Awards 2015.

Schemes such as this help to redress this balance and ensure that life-saving clinical interventions can still be delivered quickly at the time of need.

Steve Pratten, community response manager at EMAS

The Government-funded project, launched last September, sees firefighters in Long Sutton, Stamford and Woodhall Spa responding to medical emergencies in ambulances alongside EMAS paramedics and LIVES staff who then treat the patient and decide whether they need hospital treatment.

At the time it was launched, Long Sutton Fire Station watch manager Richard King said: “The crew are fully on board with this pilot because, by getting a patient to hospital faster, we can really help those who are in a life-threatening condition and increase their chances of survival.

“We have received additional medical training in preparation for the pilot which has further developed our skills and these can potentially be applied at every incident we attend.”

Steve Pratten, community response manager at EMAS, said: “We continue to face challenges in delivering an effective and efficient service, especially with a continued increase in demand year-on-year.

“In a rural county such as Lincolnshire, this demand is even more difficult to manage but at EMAS we believe that living in a beautiful, rural county should not come at the high price of sacrificing quality patient care.

“Therefore, schemes such as this help to redress this balance and ensure that life-saving clinical interventions can still be delivered quickly at the time of need.”

The project is due to run until September when the organisations will meet to decide if the project should be rolled out to other areas of the county.

Coun Sue Woolley, Lincolnshire County Council executive member for NHS liaison, said: “This has been a ground-breaking project which has, without doubt, enabled us to save lives.

“By all of these organisations and partners working together, we can ensure that we deliver the best services for residents across the county.”