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Unique character of Spalding shown in Joseph's sculptures


By Spalding Today Columnist


Joseph Hillier was commissioned by Transported and the Spalding and District Civic Society to create a series of sculptures portraying the unique character of Spalding. He scanned local people using 3D technology and eventually 14 small sculptures were cast into bronze.

These sculptures are now positioned on exterior walls across Spalding. Dougie and I picked up a trail map at the South Holland Centre and spent a sunny morning hunting out these wonderful little bronzes, writes TRISH BURGESS.

Outside Ringrose Law Solicitors in Hall Place, Spalding’s importance to our nation’s food supply is highlighted in the first three sculptures. Auction clerk, Ian, is at a table, performing one of the pivotal roles in our rural economy. Outside Crown Affair hair salon we see Michael, a local grower, who has brought a delivery of pumpkins to auction. In Red Lion Street, the more high-tech end of the food industry is shown with Pauline labelling shrink-wrapped broccoli bound for the supermarkets.

Bronze sculpture: Michael with pumpkin (17684610)
Bronze sculpture: Michael with pumpkin (17684610)

The sculpture at Boston College is very touching. Peter and Vivian, former postmaster and mistress of Cowbit, hold hands, immortalised in bronze: a lasting alternative to their lost wedding snaps.

Outside Pennington’s, Kristina and Sam are sitting with their legs swinging, carefree and happy.

We then spot market trader, Steven, with his onions, outside the Red Lion Hotel and, after a bit of searching, young Maia - on her mobile phone, tecting - perched on the outside of the Spalding Gentlemen’s Society.

Drainage engineer, John, with his theodolite, appears outside the Lincolnshire Poacher. Along the river, artists Helen and John are tiny figures outside their own Riverbank Studios.

We cross the river and head for the Chain Bridge Forge where we find blacksmith, Will, recreating a pose from an old photograph of a blacksmith 100 years ago.

Heading back to the town centre, more sculptures are found in and around The Crescent. Food production is again highlighted as we see a young man, Gundars, labouring with pallets of onions in a warehouse.

Author and farmer, Rex Sly, is captured in front of an enormous combine harvester wheel. Elizabeth and Mary stand outside their grandfather’s butchers shop, George Adams.

Finally we return to the very centre of Spalding where Fiona and Carol, who keep prize sheep, are located, quite fittingly, at the entrance to Spalding’s old Sheep Market.

• Read Trish’s blog at www.mumsgoneto.co.uk



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