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Have your say on rural crime in South Holland




Deputy Chief Constable Craig Naylor, Lincolnshire Police. Photo supplied.
Deputy Chief Constable Craig Naylor, Lincolnshire Police. Photo supplied.

South Holland and the Deepings’ rural communities are being asked to take part in one of the largest surveys ever undertaken in Britain.

The National Rural Crime Survey is to be repeated just three years after a similar poll revealed that the cost of countryside and wildlife lawbreaking was £800 million per year.

Craig Naylor, Deputy Chief Constable of Lincolnshire Police, said: “It can be very frightening for people living in rural areas if they are a victim of crime and this can lead to them feeling extremely vulnerable and isolated.

“We welcome any opportunity to hear what our rural communities think of our policing and we will work with them to help us improve our service and keep rural communities safe.”

The first National Rural Crime Survey in 2015 was completed by more than 13,000 people, with young families and farmers the most frequent victims of crime.

It also found that the average cost of rural crimes to a household was more than £2,500, whilst a business faced a bill for more than £4,000.

It can be very frightening for people living in rural areas if they are a victim of crime and this can lead to them feeling extremely vulnerable and isolated
Craig Naylor, Deputy Chief Constable of Lincolnshire Police

Marc Jones, Lincolnshire Police and Crime Commissioner, said: “If we are to help our communities thrive and stay safe, we need to understand the challenges and what the Government, police forces and other organisations can do to support the most isolated parts of the country.

“Therefore, it is crucial that the people of rural Lincolnshire make their voices heard.”

A “vicious circle” of low expectations, chronic under-reporting of crime, frustration and worry amongst residents of rural communities was unearthed by the 2015 survey, with the result being an increasing fear of crime.

Julia Mulligan, chairman of the National Rural Crime Network of which Lincolnshire Police is a member, said: “The aim of the National Rural Crime Network is to see greater recognition and understanding of the problems and impact of crime in rural communities so more can be done to help them be safe, and feel safe.

“In order to achieve that, we need to know the true picture of crime and anti-social behaviour that residents and businesses face.

“The 2015 findings uncovered some difficult truths for all those involved in protecting rural areas and now is the right time to see whether lessons have been learned, whether people are more willing to report the crime they are victims of and if they do indeed feel safer.

“I hope that anyone living or working in a rural community will spare a few minutes to complete our survey as it will provide a clear picture of what has improved and what challenges remain.”

You can find the survey at http://www.nationalruralcrimenetwork.net/research/internal/2018survey/

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