Grandmother’s Crowland coffee party for Nepal-bound relative

Margaret Beardshaw organised a coffee morning at Crowland Methodist Church to raise money for her granddaughter Emily's trip to Nepal with Chidlrach International to rebuild classrooms destroyed by an earthquake in April 2015.  Photo by Emily Beardshaw.
Margaret Beardshaw organised a coffee morning at Crowland Methodist Church to raise money for her granddaughter Emily's trip to Nepal with Chidlrach International to rebuild classrooms destroyed by an earthquake in April 2015. Photo by Emily Beardshaw.
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A Crowland grandmother is helping the people of Nepal to rebuild their lives after a devastating earthquake by raising money for a young relative.

Margaret Beardshaw organised a coffee morning at Crowland Methodist Church on Wednesday which raised at least £250 for a granddaughter Emily Beardshaw (18) to travel to Nepal in August.

It was a bit of a ‘spur of the moment’ thing to volunteer, but I liked the charity itself and where they stand on giving children a voice that needs to be heard

Emily Beardshaw, Big Build Nepal volunteer

Emily, who lived in Spalding until she was eight, has signed up for Big Build Nepal where students volunteer with global charity Childreach International to rebuild a school destroyed by an earthquake in April 2015.

Margaret said: “I’d been planning the coffee morning since the beginning of the year, getting publicity around Crowland and a little bit further away.

“I had it in the Methodist Church because it’s a nice venue and it went extremely well.

“We had a real cross-section of people there who were served tea, coffee and biscuits.

“There was also a gift stall provided by a Crowland business called Passiflora’s and, altogether, we raised between £250 and £300.”

Sally Sanders, who opened Passiflora’s as a gift shop selling interior design, herbal remedies, Fairtrade products and recycled jewellery last October, said: “Margaret took some products manufactured by a company which supports the Nepalese earthquake fund.

“I also shared details of the coffee morning on social media, seen by a lot of people, and I gave her a donation as well which all helps.”

Emily, who now lives in Manchester but is currently studying philisophy at York University, said: “I came across Big Build Nepal at the Freshers’ Fair (for new students in their first week at university).

“It was a bit of a ‘spur of the moment’ thing to volunteer and sign up, but I liked the charity itself and where they stand on giving children a voice that needs to be heard.

“I’m going out to Nepal at the end of the summer and I’ve been looking into the culture of Nepal, the facts about the earthquake (in April 2015) and how I can help the country.”

Childreach International was started by volunteers committed to the cause of international development in 2004 when it was called Global Development Links.

It changed its name to Childreach International in 2009 and opened its office in Nepal a year later from where volunteers have so far coordinated the rebuilding of almost 90 classrooms in less than 18 months.

Emily said: I have to raise £2,300 by the end of July and once I do, it’ll be so rewarding to help the children of Nepal.”

To support Emily, go to www.btplc.com/mydonate/index.aspx and then type in her name.