Flood protection condition will turn Spalding site in a “flying caravan park”

The entrance to the site in Clay Lake, Spalding. SG300317-100TW
The entrance to the site in Clay Lake, Spalding. SG300317-100TW
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Flood protection conditions will turn a site at Clay Lake, Spalding, into “flying caravan park” with homes mounted on 1.8 metre high concrete plinths.

The Environment Agency (EA) insisted on the step as Hawthorns Caravan Park switches from a transit site for gypsies to a mobile home park with 12 spaces for gypsy and non-gypsy residents.

I suppose it will be a flying caravan park, won’t it?

Coun Roger Gambba-Jones

Plans for the change of use, submitted by Mr and Mrs James Welch, were unanimously approved by the planning committee, although some members felt the site would look “bizarre” with homes standing so high up.

Committee chairman Coun Roger Gambba-Jones said: “I suppose it will be a flying caravan park, won’t it?

“It will look bizarre to have static homes 1.8 metres above the ground and access, I assume, by a wooden staircase.”

But committee member Coun Rodney Grocock said there are already park homes 5ft-6ft above the ground at Skegness and they have uPVC skirts around the concrete blocks “so it looks normal”.

After the meeting, Mr Welch told us: “I thought it was a little bit of overkill on their (EA) side, very over cautious, but I was happy to accept it because it is doable and no argument, really, with the EA. If that’s their guidelines, that’s their guidelines.”

He bought the site from his late uncle, Gordon Boswell, about 10 years ago and says there have been caravans there for around 27 or 28 years and there’s never been any flooding. Mr Welch said he knows of homes built on Clay Lake in the last couple of years that had to be raised up, but nothing like 1.8 metres.

• In February, a new build on the corner of Halmer Gate and Cley Hall Drive was given planning consent with a 1.8 metre high ground floor.