Electricity station plan for Donington farm

An artist's impression of the massive electricity converter station  - the graded colours are designed to lessen its impact on surroundings.
An artist's impression of the massive electricity converter station - the graded colours are designed to lessen its impact on surroundings.
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A massive electricity converter station with buildings measuring up to 24 metres high is likely to be built on a Donington farm.

The installation is part of the Viking Link project, and will see a new road built off the Donington A52 bypass to Northorpe Farm, in North Ing Drove, and a bridge over Hammond Beck.

Viking Link is a 1400 mega watt, high voltage direct current (DC) link between the British and Danish transmission systems.

A substation has already been built at Bicker Fen to receive the DC transmission and it will be the Donington plant’s job to convert the DC to alternating current (AC), which is what we use in our homes.

Farmer Richard Wray said National Grid is compulsorily purchasing 80 acres from his family business, Wray Farms, and the converter buildings will cover 10 acres.

Mr Wray said: “We are obviously losing the land and the income from that. It is going to create a lot of inconvenience to us farming wise and business wise.”

The 600 acres are currently farmed in a block, but the converter buildings will go close to the centre, and Mr Wray says it will effectively split the farm in two.

“I appreciate these things happen,” said Mr Wray. “At the same time it is going to create a few headaches for us farming.”

National Grid Viking Link Ltd has applied to South Holland District Council for planning consent for the installation, which will include internal roads, security fencing and up to six high voltage, AC cables linking it to the Bicker substation.

The company’s consultation document shows a range of architectural styles, including colour grading to minimise visual impact.