Police get new calls on Alan Wood murder

Alan Wood at his local, The Willoughby Arms in Little Bytham. ANL-151016-174704001
Alan Wood at his local, The Willoughby Arms in Little Bytham. ANL-151016-174704001
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Police are investigating new leads on the murder of Alan Wood following the airing of a TV documentary, Donal MacIntyre: Unsolved.

On Saturday it will be exactly six years since the 50-year-old supermarket worker and gardener’s mutilated and lifeless body was found on his living room floor.

It’s now six years on but I still believe, as I always have, that someone out there has the information we need to bring justice for Alan and his family, and would encourage anyone who thinks they can help to get in touch with us.

Det Chief Supt Stuart Morrison

The documentary, broadcast on Sunday and Monday nights, prompted new calls to Lincolnshire Police.

A force spokesman said: “We have had one or two calls arising from the broadcast of the CBS Reality programme which we will be following up. We will let the media know if there are any developments.”

The man leading the murder inquiry, Det Chief Supt Stuart Morrison, told us: “Even now, the murder of Alan is still something we think about and discuss regularly.

“The continued coverage of the case shows that there is still great interest in it.

“It’s now six years on but I still believe, as I always have, that someone out there has the information we need to bring justice for Alan and his family, and would encourage anyone who thinks they can help to get in touch with us.”

Det Chief Supt Morrison spoke to MacIntyre’s team. Cold case experts, including retired Scotland Yard Det Chief Insp Clive Driscoll and criminologist Professor David Wilson, re-examined events leading to the Bourne supermarket worker’s death at his cottage in Lound in October 2009.

The team discussed Alan’s past work as a gardener at a prison, a theory that he may have been “unwittingly” led into a more dangerous world by using prostitutes from time to time – and that his killers may have mistaken him for a boss at Sainsbury’s, virtually his double, which made him a target if they wanted keys to the store.

In an interview with this newspaper, a friend of Alan’s ruled out a link between Alan and sex workers, saying it was likely he was mistaken for a rich man because he drove a Jaguar.

In the documentary Det Chief Supt Morrison says: “Often what one’s looking for is a door marked ‘private’.

“It’s a part of someone’s life, it’s an area that may not be well known – may not be known at all to other people – but could be the cause for the murder.”

He describes the moment a work colleague and friend of Alan’s arrived at his cottage, found the front and side doors open, became uneasy and sought assistance from Alan’s landlord before entering the property.

He says: “It was clear he had been subject to a brutal attack.

“There was a great deal of blood in the property. It was a horrendous crime scene.”

Describing Alan to the cameras, he says: “In this case we have a man living a very quiet life, working at his local supermarket, running a small gardening business, no criminal associates, no enemies and no particular dramas in his life.”

Det Chief Supt Morrison says police have a full, male DNA profile of a suspected killer that sits on the UK database and some, but not all, databases around the world.

He tells MacIntyre’s team: “The main place where we could get a development these days – unless someone should call us and tell us who is responsible – would be with that DNA profile.”

Speaking to the Spalding Guardian, Mr Driscoll – best known for bringing murdered black teenager Stephen Lawrence’s killers to justice – praised Lincolnshire Police for its inquiry.

He said they had put resources into it, travelled abroad, translated appeals into at least four different languages, made appeals on Crimewatch and more.

“They have really gone the extra mile on it,” he said.

Previously ...

Bourne supermarket worker’s murder: Alan’s killers are still on the loose