POLICE FOCUS: Police at full capacity

South Holland community policing inspector Jim Tyner and a student police officer make an arrest in Sheep Market, Spalding, as part of Operation Washer.  Photo by Tim Wilson.
South Holland community policing inspector Jim Tyner and a student police officer make an arrest in Sheep Market, Spalding, as part of Operation Washer. Photo by Tim Wilson.
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There was no let-up for police in South Holland over the Christmas and New Year period, with more than 250 calls from people calling 999 and 101.

Domestic disputes, violent assaults, road crashes and thefts were among the most common reasons to call the police between 8am on Christmas Eve and 8am on New Year’s Day.

Boston and South Holland Chief Inspector Paul Timmins.

Boston and South Holland Chief Inspector Paul Timmins.

But hare coursing, neighbour disputes, criminal damage and abuse on social media also kept the police busy while families were celebrating the end of 2014 and start of 2015.

Chief Inspector Paul Timmins, who heads up community policing in South Holland, said: “Having worked over the last few New Year’s Day breaks, this one was a busy period for us. But it looked to be no busier than other Christmas periods when I’ve worked and overall, it was a successful period for us.

“We were well-resourced and well-managed as we expected to be busy, especially on New Year’s Eve and Christmas Eve when we get more demand on our services.

“There was an increase in violent offences where people were drinking more alcohol than they normally would and disputes where families and friends were falling out.

“But there wasn’t so much in the way of thefts and from my own experience of working on New Year’s Eve, I was met with a lot of friendly people who were enjoying themselves as they should do.”

Figures from police in Spalding showed there were seven arrests in the town between 7pm on New Year’s Eve and 7am on New Year’s Day, with two for drink driving. two for assault, one for a domestic assault, one for breaching the peace and one for affray.

Chief Superintendent Phil Vickers from the East Midlands Operational Support Service said: “People were well-behaved up until around midnight on New Year’s Eve and into New Year’s Day, with most of the arrests made from about 1am.

“This was mainly as a result of people having drank through the night.”