Home   News   Article

Subscribe Now

CHRISTMAS FOODBANK APPEAL 2018: Sutton Bridge Community Larder builds on its work within and across county boundaries over the last four years




When Sutton Bridge Foodbank opened in December 2014, the Reverend David Oxtoby described its work as "unconditional caring for those in crisis".

Mr Oxtoby, who left his role as priest-in-charge of Sutton Bridge and Tydd St Mary in January this year, will be pleased to know that the work of helping individuals and families "in crisis" goes on at St Matthew's Church, Sutton Bridge.

Now called Sutton Bridge Community Larder, a core team of ten volunteers are ready to provide three-day emergency food parcels to people referred to the foodbank by schools, GPs, Citizen's Advice and other community organisations on Tuesdays and Fridays, between 1pm and 3pm.

POINT OF NEED: Volunteers Charlie Doades and Verity Bowser at Sutton Bridge Community Larder. Photo (TIM WILSON): SG-271118-025TW
POINT OF NEED: Volunteers Charlie Doades and Verity Bowser at Sutton Bridge Community Larder. Photo (TIM WILSON): SG-271118-025TW

Terry York, chairman of Sutton Bridge Community Larder, said: "We changed the name of the foodbank at the beginning of the year because although we're based at St Matthew's, we're not part of St Matthew's.

"There's always a little bit of hesitancy from people to come through the church doors.

"But if anybody is in trouble, we'll always ensure they are helped in any way that we can."

Given its location, the foodbank helps clients from villages in Norfolk and Cambridgeshire, as well as Tydd St Mary and Sutton Bridge itself.

St Matthew's Church, Sutton Bridge.
St Matthew's Church, Sutton Bridge.

Terry said: "The need has always been acute here because Sutton Bridge has the highest levels of child poverty in south Lincolnshire.

"We also have a number of single parents, young couples and elderly people who are all struggling to make ends meet in today's economic climate.

"We're literally at the coal face of helping people who sometimes have nothing."

. In its first two years, Sutton Bridge Community Larder helped more than 100 adults and 75 children with food parcels.

POINT OF NEED: Volunteers Charlie Doades and Verity Bowser at Sutton Bridge Community Larder. Photo (TIM WILSON): SG-271118-026TW
POINT OF NEED: Volunteers Charlie Doades and Verity Bowser at Sutton Bridge Community Larder. Photo (TIM WILSON): SG-271118-026TW

More recently, the foodbank's work has expanded to helping the homeless and vulnerable through partnerships with the Salvation Army and King's Lynn Winter Night Shelter.

Terry York said: "We have a 24-hour helpline so that if anybody is in trouble, we can help.

"It's frustrating at times, but it's also satisfying because we fulfil a need for those who are desperate and hungry."



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More