Calls to PM for action over impact of Brexit on the county

Former Archbishop of Canterbury  Dr Rowan Williams talks to youngsters at the meeting in Long Sutton on Brexit.
Former Archbishop of Canterbury Dr Rowan Williams talks to youngsters at the meeting in Long Sutton on Brexit.
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A working group set up to give a voice to people affected by Brexit is having its case fed directly back to Theresa May.

At the latest meeting of the Social Issues in South Lincolnshire group in Long Sutton, discussions were held on the impact on communities and employment post-Brexit.

However you voted, we have moved on and we need to be positive. It is about giving local people and society a voice and not to be dismissed.

Father Jonathan Sibley, coordinator of the Social Issues in South Lincolnshire group.

Among those at the meeting at St Mary’s Church Hall was former Archbishop of Canterbury Rev Dr Rowan Williams, Assistant Chief Constable Craig Naylor, of Lincolnshire Police, and NFU (National Farmers’ Union) county advisor Danny O’Shea.

The group’s coordinator Father Jonathan Sibley said: “It is not just talking, it is a process of engagement.

“It (Brexit) is not an easy subject.

“There are tensions. However you voted, we have moved on and we need to be positive.

“It is about giving local people and society a voice and not to be dismissed.”

The group will be sending the results of its latest discussion to Downing Street.

Children from Holbeach St Marks and Gedney Drove End primary schools also attended and put their questions to Dr Williams.

Youngsters raised questions such as ‘how will people get around if bus services are axed? How will they live if they are isolated?’

“Local authorities need to respond to these challenges and the need for a mass change in attitude,” added Mr Sibley.

“This is the first step in putting things right.

“It was quite a powerful conference.

“It was said if things don’t change it could be quite a grim picture.”

The group also discussed the implications on the police force and issues regarding sharing information with the rest of Europe on terrorism and law order.

Members also questioned what will happen with new legislation involving EU nationals after Brexit.

“We have been discussing the stresses on reduced doctors and nurses and teachers; the restaurant and catering and manufacturing sectors,” Mr Sibley said.

“These are serious issues that will not go away and need to be addressed.

“There are a number of challenges that institutions and organisations need to grasp but they are not grasping them yet.”

The group’s next meeting is planned for October 11.

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