New homes and shops plan for former Spalding electrical store

David Carroll (front), former owner of Paul Taylor DJC Independent Electrical Retailers, with ex-staff members Luke Foster, Graham Boor and Alison Crampton.  Photo by Tim Wilson.
David Carroll (front), former owner of Paul Taylor DJC Independent Electrical Retailers, with ex-staff members Luke Foster, Graham Boor and Alison Crampton. Photo by Tim Wilson.
  • Plea for affordable homes term to be dropped
0
Have your say

Plans for a former electrical store and a mobility scooter shop in Spalding to become new homes and shops may go ahead without any affordable housing.

Developers want to build 27 new homes and three shops on the site of Paul Taylor Electrical Retailers, Winsover Road, which closed in May 2013 after nearly 50 years of trading in Spalding, and Spalding Mobility Centre.

We have come to the conclusion that the proposed development is unable to sustain the level of affordable housing as set out in the planning permission

Surveyors acting for Octagon Developments (Cambs) Ltd, Peterborough

South Holland District Council planners give the scheme the go-ahead in May 2014, with a condition that at least nine of the homes should be made available to people unable to afford to rent or buy from the housing market.

A statement from surveyors acting for Octagon Developments (Cambs) Ltd, Peterborough, the firm behind the scheme, said: “The site contains vacant shops, workshops, storage buildings, flats and what we believe to be former (East Midlands) Electricity Board offices and social club.

“During a site visit, (we) noted that all the buildings were disused and site was secure, with the windows (at) the (back) of the site being boarded up.

“Planning permission was granted on May 27, 2014, (for) the demolition of all the existing buildings on the site and the construction of new-build properties (three retail units on Winsover Road, 20 flats, seven town houses and five car parking spaces).”

District councillors gave planning permission on the basis that the developers would pay a contribution of nearly £55,000 towards educational and leisure provision in Spalding, plus the cost of moving an electrical sub-station in Short Street, Spalding, which could be almost £39,000.

Another of the 21 conditions for the scheme consent was outlined in the surveyors’ statement which said: “Prior to the commencement of development, the applicant is to submit to a scheme for the provision and phasing of one-third of the residential units as affordable housing,

“We have been informed by the applicant that they purchased the site in March 2016 for the sum of £360,000 and the local market conditions are favourable for development in Spalding.

“However, we have come to the conclusion that the proposed development is unable to sustain the level of affordable housing as set out in the planning permission dated May 27, 2014.”

A report at the time the scheme was granted described it as “ well-thought-out” and one that would “improve the quality of the area”.

End of an era as electrical shop closes