Home   News   Article

Subscribe Now

The Flippin' Pain campaign visited Weston Fun Farm in Spalding to address Lincolnshire's chronic pain problem




A public health initiative aiming to tackle Lincolnshire’s chronic pain problem visited Spalding.

Flippin’ Pain were at Weston Fun Farm yesterday (Monday) to educate residents about persistent pain and how to manage it.

Cormac Ryan, a professor of clinical rehabilitation at Teesside University and the Community Pain Champion for Flippin’ Pain, spoke to the Lincolnshire Free Press before the event.

Flippin' Pain's Brain Bus in Spalding. (51233025)
Flippin' Pain's Brain Bus in Spalding. (51233025)

“Spalding will be visited by our Brain Bus. It is an interactive, sensory experience,” he said.

“It’s like a mobile lab for understanding the psychology and science behind perception.

“Pain is influenced not just by our bodies, but also our fears, anxieties, where we live, our social networks. All these sorts of things. Explaining that to people doesn’t always hit home, but if you can demonstrate it to them it’s much more powerful.

Flippin' Pain's Brain Bus in Spalding. (51233028)
Flippin' Pain's Brain Bus in Spalding. (51233028)

“It’s experiential learning. It can be the difference between someone hearing this and it not clicking, and them telling their friends down at the pub for the next ten years about something they saw in a van in Spalding.”

The event took place in the midst of what Flippin’ Pain described as a major problem, and their research suggests that Lincolnshire is in the top ten areas of the UK with high levels of opioid prescriptions.

“There are some things we know that are linked to Opioid use. One of these is levels of deprivation,” said Mr Ryan regarding why that might be.

“We see higher levels in areas that are more deprived, and I think it’s to do with culture and historic levels of prescriptions as well.

“Over the past five years, you see that these relatively high levels of Opioid consumption have been going on for some time now.

“I think part of it is just a culture of carrying on what you’ve already been doing.

“There’s no one easy answer, but those will certainly be involved.”

He believes events like yesterday’s are the best way to go about tackling issues like this.

“It’s all about how we as the general public understand persistent pain,” he said.

“It’s all about how we as the general public understand persistent pain.

“We used to understand it in a very medical way, where hurt meant harm and that you had to fix an injury for it to get better.

“Those are all myths, misconceptions and misunderstandings.

“Pain can persist long after tissue healing has occurred. It is influenced by lots of different factors.”



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More