Home   News   Article

Awards for police team tackling hare coursing in South Holland




Chief Inspector Jim Tyner with Rachel Watson, head of the Police Workforce and Capability Unit at the Home Office. Photo supplied by Lincolnshire Police.
Chief Inspector Jim Tyner with Rachel Watson, head of the Police Workforce and Capability Unit at the Home Office. Photo supplied by Lincolnshire Police.

Four police officers at the heart of an operation to tackle hare coursing in South Holland and Lincolnshire have been recognised for their work.

Chief Inspector Jim Tyner and Constables Martin Green, James Perring and Nick Willey, were presented with Chief Constable’s Commendations at a ceremony on Tuesday.

The four officers, all part of Operation Galileo, were commended for confronting and deterring “very unpleasant people doing really unpleasant things”, according to their citations.

As a result, reports of hare coursing fell by 25 per cent across South Holland and Boston, with a 30.5 per cent drop across Lincolnshire as a whole.

Chief Inspector Tyner, ex-neighbourhood policing inspector for South Holland and now tactical lead on rural crime at Lincolnshire Police, said: “The rural crime officers are really pleased to have their work on Operation Galileo recognised in this way.

“We understand that there is still a lot of work to do in this area and thank our partners who have helped us in our fight against hare coursing.”

The rural crime officers are really pleased to have their work on Operation Galileo recognised in this way
Chief Inspector Tyner, tactical lead on rural crime, Lincolnshire Police

In June 2017, Chief Constable Bill Skelly announced the launch of a new Rural Community Safety Strategy in response to complaints from farmers and landowners about the way hare coursing and other rural crime was being treated.

There followed a £750,000 investment in off-road vehicles, thermal imaging technology, dog microchipping equipment and a drone to respond to the threat of hare coursing gangs directly.

The four officers’ citations said: “The Rural Crime Team has helped develop how we more effectively engage with farmers, trained officers across the force around the relevant legislation, and its practical application, been on call and made themselves available to anyone who might need help.

“These officers have all gone well beyond what would normally be expected and without their commitment and dedication, we would not have seen the reduction in offences that we have, resulting in fewer victims of this type of crime across the county.”

Mr Skelly said: “A career in policing is exceptionally challenging, but also rewarding for those who go the extra mile. “Duty and service is at the heart of what we do and there can be no higher calling than to accept it as your duty to serve others.

“I am very proud and privileged to celebrate the successes of these officers.”

Lincolnshire Police cut hare coursing by seizing and rehoming dogs

Hare coursing reports across South Holland fall by a quarter

Police ‘raise our game’ to cut hare coursing



COMMENTS
()


Iliffe Media does not moderate comments. Please click here for our house rules.

People who post abusive comments about other users or those featured in articles will be banned.

Thank you. Your comment has been received and will appear on the site shortly.

 

Terms of Comments

We do not actively moderate, monitor or edit contributions to the reader comments but we may intervene and take such action as we think necessary, please click here for our house rules.

If you have any concerns over the contents on our site, please either register those concerns using the report abuse button, contact us here.

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More