April’s heavy rainfall will not stop the hosepipe ban

Under water: police were forced to close off Raymond Mays Way in Bourne after the heavy rainfall prompted safety fears.
Under water: police were forced to close off Raymond Mays Way in Bourne after the heavy rainfall prompted safety fears.
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THE ban on using hosepipes at home will continue, despite more than an inch of rain falling in 24 hours in some parts of Lincolnshire over the weekend.

Anglian Water says it will take much more than a few wet weeks to reverse the effects of drought, which followed the driest 18 months on record across the region.

This road in Bourne was closed because of flooding.

This road in Bourne was closed because of flooding.

This weekend the A151 in Bourne was closed by Lincolnshire Police because of safety after Raymond Mays Way was submerged in water following heavy downpours.

Flood alerts have also been put in force by the Environment Agency on minor watercourses of the South Forty Foot Drain from Heckington to Bourne.

According to statistics from The Met Office, the highest rainfall recorded in the county from 9pm on Saturday to the same time the next day was 32mm in Waddington, near Lincoln. Holbeach also featured among the “regional extremes” after experts found it had the highest temperature on Sunday at 11.7ºC.

Anglian Water spokesman Antony Innes said: “The irony that it has rained most days since the hosepipe ban was introduced has not been lost on us. It is a relief for the environment, and I’m sure our customers will have found it useful in the garden.

“However, we must keep in mind that this drought is the result of almost two years of below average rainfall. Unfortunately, it’s going to take more than a few wet weeks to reverse the impact of that.

“We’ve always said that what we need to reverse this drought, and to allow us to lift the ban, is a prolonged period of above average rainfall, over winter, when it can have the most impact on rivers, reservoirs, and underground aquifers. These reservoirs and aquifers are the stores of water we rely on for our drinking water supplies.

“We’ve introduced a ban because we’re thinking about 2013, and the prospect of a third dry winter. We’re taking prudent steps to ensure, should the worst happen, we are in the best position we can be to maintain customers’ supplies. Protecting these supplies is our priority.”