A saviour is needed to stop heritage going to auction

John Lyon (centre) looks at some of the finds from the Pinchbeck History and Archeaology Project with Brenda Ruysen and Ray Tucker.  Photo by Tim Wilson.  Photo: SG030812-133TW.  www.spaldingtoday.co.uk/buyaphoto ENGANL00120120308175418
John Lyon (centre) looks at some of the finds from the Pinchbeck History and Archeaology Project with Brenda Ruysen and Ray Tucker. Photo by Tim Wilson. Photo: SG030812-133TW. www.spaldingtoday.co.uk/buyaphoto ENGANL00120120308175418
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LAST LOTS: John Lyon (centre), Brenda Ruysen and Ray Tucker with artefacts from Pinchbeck’s Lost

Manor. Photo (TIM WILSON): SG030812-133TW.

Sixty-five silver coins, valued at between £300 and £400 each, are to be sold at auction after a decision by Pinchbeck History and Archaeology Group to end its “Lost Manor” project.

The coins, along with many other artefacts, were discovered at Healey’s field where some of the find was later discovered to have dated back to the 13th century.

John Lyon, of Pinchbeck History and Archaeology Group, said: “The project gave me so much pleasure and we would have liked to excavate another field but we don’t have the money.”

Mr Lyon kickstarted this project five years ago when an old map showed that Pinchbeck once had a manor house, sparking his interest in the history of the area. He was so keen that he funded the project himself and, with the help of Allen Archaeology, now has about 200 trays of 
artefacts.

The dig proved to be a perfect educational opportunity, with children from Pinchbeck East Church of England primary school joining in with the project and they even had a go at washing some of the finds.

After five years of digging, the Pinchbeck History and 
Archaeology Group have sadly decided to close the search as they were unable to gain Lottery funding.

Despite the huge amount of artefacts being discovered, there has been no interest to continue to excavate the land.

Mr Lyon is disappointed and said: “There are more 
important things to discover.”

The coins will be auctioned off if no one comes forward to back the excavation work and the proceeds will go back into the community.

Many of the other artefacts will have to be disposed of.

In February, Mr Lyons said “it would be a travesty if the items we have unearthed were lost again”.

As for the future of the site, Mr Lyon is happy for someone to take over the project and has even said that he would happily help with the uncovering of the artefacts.

However, it seems uncertain as no one has stepped forward to take over the excavation and continue to search for Pinchbeck’s “Lost Mansion”, but there is still time to save the historical treasures as no auction date has been set.