CONCERT REVIEW: Real essence of chamber music comes in a quartet

The Ruisi String Quartet, the third in this season's series of South Holland Concerts.  Photo supplied.
The Ruisi String Quartet, the third in this season's series of South Holland Concerts. Photo supplied.
  • ‘The essence of chamber music, the pinnacle of refinement, miniature perfection’
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The Ruisi String Quartet, South Holland Concerts, South Holland Centre, Spalding

Brothers Alessandro (first violin) and Max Ruisi (cellist), second violinist Oliver Cave and viola player Tetsuumi Nagata, were the guests of South Holland Centre on Saturday.

In the words of the concert programme, “the string quartet is often seen as the essence of chamber music - the pinnacle of refinement where every musical idea and nuance is developed and honed to miniature perfection.”

The Ruisi String Quartet captured all that in works by Haydn, Mozart and Mendelssohn, transporting their audience to the world’s finest concert halls.

Haydn’s String Quartet op.50 no.1, dedicated to the King of Prussia, opened the concert with four movements played with dexterity, empathy and solidarity by the quartet.

Fittingly, one of Haydn’s classical music disciples - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - followed as the meat of the concert in the form of his String Quartet no.19.

Mozart was a huge admirer of Haydn for the way that he brought the string quartet together in the music sphere

Max Ruisi, The Ruisi String Quartet

Max Ruisi said: “I’m really pleased we’re playing these two pieces together because they work so well as a pair.

“Mozart was a huge admirer of Haydn for the way that he brought the string quartet together in the music sphere.”

The concert ended with Mendelssohn’s String Quartet op.44 no.2, capturing all the romance which the composer brought to it so soon after his marriage in 1837.

Review by Winston Brown