SPORT TALK: Cheers for Andy’s tears highlight our sporting problems

Taking the Swiss: The British reaction to Andy Murray, pictured in Sunday's Wimbledon final, is a typical one. Photo by EMPICS Sport
Taking the Swiss: The British reaction to Andy Murray, pictured in Sunday's Wimbledon final, is a typical one. Photo by EMPICS Sport
0
Have your say

HOW typical that it required Andy Murray to break down into tears for much of the public to finally get behind him.

Sunday’s Wimbledon final was a landmark moment in British tennis. Regardless of the outcome, Murray’s appearance in the SW19 showpiece should have been celebrated by the masses.

His performance against Roger Federer, perhaps the finest player in the sport’s great history, had me believing he was about to break his Grand Slam duck (and I’m still sure he will).

As you’ll know by now, Swiss maestro Federer – who is still the coolest sportsman around – turned the tables and wrote a bit of history of his own in the process.

Murray’s emotional outburst was pretty unexpected in the aftermath, but seemingly what the public wanted. Apparently we love a good ‘loser’.

Well, the Scot is far from that. He’s the finest British player for more than 70 years, perhaps ever. Yet because he doesn’t smile or pander to the crowd, he’s considered dour and disinterested.

As something of a misery guts myself, I’m firmly in Murray’s camp. He gets asked ridiculous, leading questions throughout the two-week Wimbledon event (often about his mum or girlfriend) and it seems a large slice of the English fans out there refuse to back him. Mainly because he once suggested he wanted “anyone but England” to win the football World Cup.

What’s wrong with that? Scotland and England are massive rivals in football, but in tennis – like the Olympics – it’s all about Great Britain.

Considering all the hysteria about the London Games – which Murray is competing in, by the way – you’d have thought the sporting nation would embrace one of the few genuinely world class athletes our shores have produced in recent times.

WASN’T it great seeing Australia bust a gut in trying to win Tuesday night’s dead-rubber ODI against England at Old Trafford? For years it’d been the other way round, as our cricketers fed off scraps against the old enemy.

But the 4-0 series whitewash for Alastair Cook’s men proves just how far the tables have turned.