Your letters: What you’ve said about the average speed camera plans for the A16 at Crowland

Average speed cameras will go live soon on the A16 Crowland bypass. SG071116-210TW
Average speed cameras will go live soon on the A16 Crowland bypass. SG071116-210TW

I read with interest your article about the average speed cameras about to go live on the A16.

I would point out that, although they are not yet working, it has already had an effect on the speed of drivers.

I would say at this point I find it difficult to understand why so much has to be spent on making drivers do what they should be doing in the first place.

Surely this money could be better spent on other projects, such as repairing the hundreds of pot holes that litter the county’s roads.

I live down the road from the A16/B1166 junction, which has been a living nightmare since it was installed.

I wrote numerous letters at the time, but, as always, the authorities claimed to know better.

The only solution is a roundabout, as drivers pulling out at the moment cannot tell the speed of the vehicles coming towards them, however this may alter when the cameras are active. Let’s hope so.

As for drivers using James Road as a race track, this will never change until more restrictive measures are put in place.

Whatever happened to the police officer who would jump out as you approached him with a radar speed gun?

If this were to be initiated again, it would need to be between the hours of 7am and 8.30am, and 4pm and 6pm, not during the day, when the road is little used.

The main problem with the majority of drivers today is that whatever they do wrong, which in most cases is quite a lot, they have a 99 per cent chance of getting away with it – a result of the Government messing about with police budgets.

Consideration for other motorists would also not go amiss.

John Messenger

Crowland

And we had the following letter from David Patrick:

I have just been reading your article on the speed cameras on the A16.

I use the link road from Spalding to Peterborough on a daily basis, using a number of vehicles.

It is difficult to see why this stretch of road was not designed as a dual carriageway.

This would solve many of the problems, such as incidents of dangerous overtaking when people become stuck behind slow-moving HGVs, and ensure that people get to their destinations safely.

David Pattrick

by email

• What do you think? You can comment on these letters or email spaldingeditor@jpress.co.uk