YOUR LETTERS: Gosberton used as rat run

A dangerous bend in Gosberton.
A dangerous bend in Gosberton.

With regard to the recent articles on the abysmal traffic problems in Gosberton.

There are two issues that need to be addressed as a matter of urgency.

They are the need for a crossing on Gosberton high street and a restriction on the use of Gosberton as a rat run for heavy lorries.

With the significant and sustained increase in traffic on the A152, as confirmed in the recent traffic survey, the village has effectively been cut in two.

While one side of the high street has the medical centre, a butcher’s and a main bus stop, the other side has a post office, dentist and stores.

For a thriving village with a significant older population and young children attending two schools, it is an intolerable situation.

The population of the village and the traffic flow, on a straight road, through the village demands action.

Part of this increase in traffic relates to the heavy lorries thundering through the village all hours of the day, seven days a week.

With many properties so close to the main road and a minimal footpath, this too is not only a significant nuisance but also a threat to pedestrians.

While I understand that we are in a rural area with many livelihoods dependent upon produce and its transportation, the only reason for this traffic is profit.

The transport companies simply use Gosberton as a rat run to avoid the A17, reduce costs and increase their profit. All at the expense of safety, health and society.

Although this is not a new problem, there has been a substantial increase in lorry movements through the village in recent years.

The villages of Quadring, Gosberton and Donnington are all affected by this blight, all for the sake of 4.7 miles – the difference in distance between using the A17 rather than the A152.

While a pedestrian crossing in the village would be welcome, the air and noise pollution from lorries stopping and starting would be more intolerable than at present.

The only solution is an immediate weight limit through the high street and a pedestrian crossing.

We cannot afford to have another village cut in two by unnecessary traffic and risk the lives of our community.

It is, of course, understood that the current Turners depot in Quadring would not be affected by any weight limit, although we would expect it to be applicable to the depot in Donnington.

I would, however, express sympathy with the villagers of Quadring and question the council for allowing such a high volume of vehicle movements so late in the evening.