WEEKEND WEB: What’s not to love about bouncy, beautiful Bridget?

Nico
Nico
0
Have your say

We often hear that puppies need to be socialised – but what does that really mean?

When dogs are young (up to around 12 to 14 weeks of age) they will investigate new things in their lives with interest. As they get older they begin to see new things they haven’t seen before as scary.

We want our dogs to grow up confident and so the more things we can introduce them to in a positive way whilst they are young, the more things they can store away in their mind as not being scary.

What sort of things should we introduce our puppies to? The short answer is ‘everyday life’.

We need our puppies to meet as much as possible of the human world. This may include men, short men, tall men, men with beards, men with glasses, men in ‘high vis’ jackets and big boots; ladies, short, tall, with glasses, long hair, short hair etc… the list goes on. Don’t forget the postman, delivery people, people wearing hats, joggers…

Our puppies also need to meet other animals and learn that other human items and situations are not scary.

Think about making a list and steadily introducing your puppy. Don’t forget places and situations like the veterinary surgery, kennels, other people’s houses, fetes, public transport, lifts, escalators and travelling in the car. Household items also need to be thought about. What about balloons, umbrellas, hairdryers, vacuum cleaners?

Try to ensure that your puppy never feels worried or scared by a situation and don’t try to force them. Socialisation needs to be a positive experience and undertaken gradually. Start off with at a distance and work at your puppy’s pace, rewarding them for being calm.

Puppies need to be kept safe and so we need to ensure that they are covered against contagious diseases. Your socialisation programme must take into consideration vaccination and worming protocols. If in doubt, take advice from your veterinary surgery.

You can continue socialising your dog until they are around a year old (and really even after that), in a stress-free way. Keeping them used to situations can ensure that they don’t forget they are not scary.

• We run a variety of training classes and 1-2-1s at Jerry Green Dog Rescue. If you would like to find out more about positive training techniques call our centre trainer on 01205 260546.

She enjoys having lots of fusses and cuddles. Bridget is a very clever girl who loves showing off all of her brilliant tricks (she especially loves to twirl on her back legs and also do a gracious roll over).

Bridget

Bridget

Bridget has socialised with other dogs when out and about but would prefer a home where she is the only pet so she can have all the attention for herself. 

She can be quite a bouncy girl but has met children of varying ages while being in foster care. We feel she could possibly live with children who are experienced with slightly bouncy dogs. 

Beautiful, great around kids and great fun... what is not to love? Call 01205 260546 or email slincs@jerrygreendogs.org.uk

• Do you remember Nico, a previous dog of the week who we featured in May?

Nico is an eight-year-old crossbreed originally from Spain and was handed in from his English rescuer when she unfortunately became too ill to care for him.

Sadly, when he came to us Nico was suffering quite badly with some allergies so had lost quite a bit of his hair.

We managed, with the help of our vets, to get to the bottom of his allergies and get him on a diet that suited him.

Gradually Nico started to improve and grow his hair back. Sadly he wasn’t so great at selling himself when people came to visit and often ignored anyone that came to enquire about him... and so was left waiting for his forever home.

Fantastically, last month Nico found his perfect match and has finally gone to his forever home.

He now spends his day at the seaside going for beach walks with his new mum. Hurray for Nico – we wish you all the best in your new life by the sea.

• We often hear that puppies need to be socialised – but what does that really mean?

When dogs are young (up to around 12 to 14 weeks of age) they will investigate new things in their lives with interest. As they get older they begin to see new things they haven’t seen before as scary.

We want our dogs to grow up confident and so the more things we can introduce them to in a positive way whilst they are young, the more things they can store away in their mind as not being scary.

What sort of things should we introduce our puppies to? The short answer is ‘everyday life’.

We need our puppies to meet as much as possible of the human world. This may include men, short men, tall men, men with beards, men with glasses, men in ‘high vis’ jackets and big boots; ladies, short, tall, with glasses, long hair, short hair etc… the list goes on. Don’t forget the postman, delivery people, people wearing hats, joggers…

Our puppies also need to meet other animals and learn that other human items and situations are not scary.

Think about making a list and steadily introducing your puppy. Don’t forget places and situations like the veterinary surgery, kennels, other people’s houses, fetes, public transport, lifts, escalators and travelling in the car. Household items also need to be thought about. What about balloons, umbrellas, hairdryers, vacuum cleaners?

Try to ensure that your puppy never feels worried or scared by a situation and don’t try to force them. Socialisation needs to be a positive experience and undertaken gradually. Start off with at a distance and work at your puppy’s pace, rewarding them for being calm.

Puppies need to be kept safe and so we need to ensure that they are covered against contagious diseases. Your socialisation programme must take into consideration vaccination and worming protocols. If in doubt, take advice from your veterinary surgery.

You can continue socialising your dog until they are around a year old (and really even after that), in a stress-free way. Keeping them used to situations can ensure that they don’t forget they are not scary.

• We run a variety of training classes and 1-2-1s at Jerry Green Dog Rescue. If you would like to find out more about positive training techniques call our centre trainer on 01205 260546.

Previously...

Can you help keeps our dogs warm this winter?

Lovely Larry looking for love