WEEKEND WEB: ‘Violent strain’ caused demise

Mr H A Sneath, of Thurlby, near Bourne, was made a Justice of the Peace for the Kesteven division of Lincolnshire.
Mr H A Sneath, of Thurlby, near Bourne, was made a Justice of the Peace for the Kesteven division of Lincolnshire.
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We look back 100 years to the time of the First World War

A painfully-sudden death took place at Bourne.

Mr Cecil Fisher had been attending a a drill of the volunteers and subsequently took part in a tug of war.

Immediately after taking part in this, the deceased lay down, stating that he was ‘winded’.

It was, however, soon apparent to those around that something of a more serious character than at first anticipated had occurred and medical aid was at once prodcured.

But life was extinct and the body was conveyed to the Marquis of Granby Inn, opposite.

Mr Fisher had been employed as a drayman by Messrs Wherry and Sons, corn merchants, at Bourne, and this was the second of their employees who had died under sudden circumstances in the previous two months.

He left a widow and four children – all boys – the eldest of whom also worked at Messrs Wherry and Sons, in the grocery department.

A public subscription was made for the benefit of the widow and family, initiated by the officers of the volunteers and supported by the chairman of the Urban Council.

The inquest was held at the Marquis of Granby Inn by deputy coroner, Major Bell.

Bertie Fisher, brother-in-law of the deceased, gave evidence of identification and said his brother-in-law, who he saw every day, had frequently complained of feeling unwell and had at times complained of shortness of breath.

The deceased was not picked for one of the tugof war sides, but still took part and after three pulls, fell on his face.

Dr Gilpin said he had known Mr Fisher for several years and that he had attended him a few years back for a serious bout of rheumatic fever. which had left the deceased with a dilated heart. In his opinion, the death was caused by failure of the heart due to violent straining.

There’s always a rotten apple . . . or five

Arthur Twell (15),Richard Twell (16), James Hallam (20), James Hayden and Claud Smith, were charged with disorderly conduct in Woad Lane, Long Sutton.

PC Batchless said the boys were pelting rotten apples at people’s house at midnight and were a regular nuisance.

Arthur and Richard Twell were fined 15s and Hallam 20s.

Having just joined the Army, the cases against Hayden and Smith were withdrawn.

No licence to employ servant

Frank Brooks, of Long Sutton, was summoned for employing a man servant without a licence.

Brooks appeared for work for which a licence was required, but afterwards threw up this work and preferred housework.

In other news . . .

The attendance of Mr Storr’s string band at the Spalding Picture House on Thursday night each week made that night of the week the ‘extra’ performance.

The music rendered was a ‘decided acquisition’ and was set to become a permanant fixture.

• A nasty accident occurred at Spalding Station, when Mr Palmer, a railway employee working in the goods shed, tore his hand on a nail, causing a dangerous wound to the palm of his hand. Mr Sherrard, also on the station staff, bound up his hand until a doctor could be obtained.

• Mr H A Sneath, of Thurlby, near Bourne, (pictured) was made a Justice of the Peace for the Kesteven division of Lincolnshire.