WEEKEND WEB: Lincolnshire Free Press letters

Labour campaign in Spalding market place
Labour campaign in Spalding market place
0
Have your say

Your views on politics, development and shipping...

Labour campaign day in Spalding

On Saturday, September 30, members of the South Holland and the Deepings Constituency Labour Party were out again in Spalding market place spreading the message of hope.

As part of Labour’s National Campaign Day, we were talking to the voters about the Labour Party’s national policies and listening to their concerns related to both local and national political issues.

Labour is working to bring hope and a better future for our country with the following commitments:

• Care for the NHS;

• Phase in the National Education Service;

• Care for working people by introducing a Real Living Wage and banning zero hours contracts;

• Introducing free childcare hours to give every child the best start in life;

• Ensuring care for and dignity of the elderly.

The event was hugely successful with our activists engaging with local residents and receiving some very positive response.

Let us all work together for the better future of our country.

Voyteck Kowalewski

Chair, Constituency Labour Party, South Holland and the Deepings

Trying to contact the Crane family

My name is Harold Eric Crane, I live in Queensland, Australia and I am the great great grandson of Thomas Crane, born in Horbling around 1810 and died in Wellington, Australia in 1852.

Over the years I have done a considerable amount of research into my family tree and the other day I found a number of obituaries for Harold Cranes around the world and there is one which holds some interest to me:

Harold William (Bill) Crane who died March 19, 2016, husband of the late Margaret and father of Pauline, Vivian, Graham and the late Wendy, buried in the Churchyard at St Mary Magdalene Church , Gedney on April 14, 2016.

My interest is in being able to contact his family in the hope that one of them may have some interest in family trees.

I can tell them heaps more about the family, in particular Thomas, who married in Peterborough in 1835, had 10 children and became the post master in Peterborough and subsequently was convicted of theft from his employer and transported to Australia in 1849. I am a direct decendant of him.

I can be contacted at: 281 Robinson Road, Geham. 4352. Queensland, Australia, or by emailing haroldcrane41@gmail.com

Harold Crane

via email

They need not have bothered with policy

South Holland District Council really don’t need to bother to create a policy to deal with ‘vexatious’ complaints. They should do what they’ve always done and ignore them until the complainant gets frustrated, exasperated, tired and eventually goes away.

Anyone who’s ever been involved in politics at any level recognises the tactic.

The last thing officials – either elected or paid - want is to have to answer difficult and persistent questions that challenge their actions or authority. The unwritten rule appears to be: ‘Don’t rock the boat, protect your back, prevaricate as long as possible, deny everything and lie as a last resort.’

They’ve rewritten the definition of democracy: it’s now government of the people, by the people, for themselves. Social justice? It’s an alien concept.

As for a “commitment to transparency and openness” – don’t make me laugh.

Doug Whyles

Surfleet

Bring on the Lidl plan!

(Regarding Lidl’s plan to open a second Spalding store on the site of the former Welland Hospital) Bring it on.

This is the best news we’ve heard for quite a while, a brilliant idea.

Fingers crossed the plans are passed and Lidl is soon up and running.

Gill Bycraft

via email

Industrial estate would be better site

With regards to the plans for Lidl to build on the old Welland Hospital site, I feel it would make more sense to build on the Pinchbeck industrial area, giving better road access from Spalding and surrounding areas.

Jayne Mason

via email

Foundations have all but disappeared

Like John Hayes I too am moved by the nostalgia of the Last Night of the Proms and the rendering of Rule Britannia. Sixty years ago Britain’s merchant shipping fleet was in number and tonnage the largest in the world and the Royal Navy the second largest navy and although in decline Britain remained a major ship building country.

Like John I too applaud the Britain’s innovative skilled professional expertise, integrity and business acumen that enables British firms to still dominate the provision of those services that maritime commerce rely on. Their activity generates a positive contribution to Britain’s annual national income.

But the cold facts of reality intrude into such nostalgic dreams. Britain’s merchant fleet is now ranked 15th in the world. Its tonnage 12 million tonnes. The combined tonnage of three super tankers or super container ships approach one million tonnes. British-owned ships sailing under flags of convenience are still subject to international legal requirements over issues of safety, loading, insurance and tracking but not subject to globally determined pay and conditions for their crews.

Sailing under flags of convenience reduces ship owners operating costs. Shipping makes a disproportionate contribution to global warming. Sea born traffic is slow. Steaming at 20 knots a ship using the Suez Canal takes approximately 40 days to travel from Shanghai to Thames Estuary or Rotterdam.

Bigger ships require deep water ports. Britain’s major deep water ports handling intercontinental trade Felixstowe, Southampton and a new facility in the Thames estuary, all European facing, are expanding their transit trade, breaking down large container shipments and individual container loads for transmission to destinations across Europe.

The ports of tomorrow will require large areas for adjacent warehousing. Free Port trading status which could minimise necessary customs paperwork could rebuild the Thames estuary’s traditional role as the gateway into Europe. The Teeside local authorities are promoting Free Port Status.

The foundations of Britain’s remaining maritime heritage have all but disappeared. Major maritime hubs are emerging elsewhere like Singapore, Rotterdam, New York. The talent that has anchored maritime servicing in London is highly mobile and can easily provide its services via the internet from other locations.

The Government is considering tax incentives to tempt maritime activities back to Britain. Tax incentives are an unfair non tariff constraint on the freedom of trade. Isn’t this the problem currently facing Bombardier aero space division.

Trump will put America first, the EU will put the EU first. The emerging continental scale customs unions which reduced or eliminate tariffs between members will put protecting their members’ interests first.

The EU’s success in reducing poverty and improving the living standards of all its people is being emulated through the emerging continental scale customs unions.

India has to create 12 million new jobs every year and lift its 500 million households out of extreme poverty. Any future free trade deal with Britain must help the Indian Government to achieve its economic priorities. Britain’s future prosperity is not the developing world’s problem; its ours.

Paul Walls

Spalding

Did you serve on the Grey Funnel Line?

HMS Bulwark, Albion and Centaur Naval Associations welcomes personnel who have served any time on the former carriers, R06, R07, R08 and the current Albion and Bulwark, L14 and L15.

Membership is currently around 500. A journal is produced three times a year and annual weekend reunions are held – next year we are at the Lord Cornwall Hotel, Plymouth. with the AGM being held on board the current HMS Bulwark.

The association has active regional reps, we sponsor Sea Cadets from our affiliated units, some members and their wives have regular meetings at local pubs.

Annual membership is £10 for full and associate members. Enquiries to Denis Askham on 01226 384283; Harry Roddis on 01709 816667 or www.bulwarkassoc.co.uk

Harry Roddis

15 Palmerston Avenue

Maltby

Rotherham S66 8HS