UPDATE: Long Sutton charity says five cats have died from poisoning in Gedney Drove End this year

Library picture: A Long Sutton charity is warning residents to take care with substances known to be deadly to cats.

Library picture: A Long Sutton charity is warning residents to take care with substances known to be deadly to cats.

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A Long Sutton cat rescue charity has now revealed five cats have died of poisoning in Gedney Drove End so far this year.

The number was confirmed by a volunteer with Long Sutton’s P J Cat Rescue, who said the poisonous substance involved in the cases is unknown..

The volunteer told us: “This figure is abnormally high.”

The revelation followed news of a cat in the charity’s long term care dying from antifreeze or rat poisoning.

• A Long Sutton cat rescue charity says antifreeze or rat poisoning was to blame for the death of a cat in its long-term care.

The cat had been with a foster carer for 18 months when it became ill and died.

A volunteer with P J Cat Rescue said a vet blamed the death on antifreeze or rat poison.

The volunteer, who asked not to be named, has since heard of two other cats becoming seriously ill, as a result of suspected poisoning, and is asking residents to take care with substances that are known to be deadly to cats.

“We think someone has been a bit careless by leaving an open container of antifreeze in their garden,” he said. “Or it could be that someone has put rat poison in the wrong type of dispenser. In the past, people used the pipe and funnel dispenser filled up with poison grain to put outside, but now you are only allowed to use an enclosed trap box.”

The volunteer also warned cat owners to take their pets to the vet as soon as possible if they suspect poisoning.

According to the RSPCA, signs of antifreeze poisoning in cats can include: vomiting, the pet appearing depressed, sleepy and/or drunk and uncoordinated.

Fits (seizures) and difficulty in breathing are also symptoms.

Pet MD say signs of rat poisoning can include loss of appetite, impaired movement, paralysis of hind limbs, slight muscle tremors, generalised seizures and depression of the central nervous system.

• If you suspect your pet has been poisoned, please call Lynne Harrison in our newsroom on 01775 765413.