Trekkie teaching the world Klingon

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A DEDICATED Trekkie is on board with a new language ‘enterprise’ – providing the voice for a CD teaching the language of Klingon.

Star Trek fan Charlotte Kebbell (39), from West Pinchbeck, runs informal club Starbase 24 with her husband James, a fellow Trekkie, and through that got the chance to appear on Talk Now! Learn Klingon.

Charlotte Kebbell in costume as Klingon female Fleet Captain Kehlan, with Jonathan Brown who worked on the CD-ROM with her. Picture supplied

Charlotte Kebbell in costume as Klingon female Fleet Captain Kehlan, with Jonathan Brown who worked on the CD-ROM with her. Picture supplied

The CD-ROM aims to teach the US sci-fi series’ legion of loyal fans how to translate everyday words into the language of the show’s warrior race.

Charlotte said: “There are phrases like ‘How much will it cost?’ and ‘Where can I find a taxi?’.

“There’s nothing about starships and warpdrives – it’s all the sorts of things you might need if you were walking around Spalding and that you would learn if you started any other language.”

Charlotte works as a technical administrator at Univeg in Spalding – where she shares her passion for sci-fi with several other colleagues.

She was schooled in the words she needed for the guide by UK Klingon translator Jonathan Brown.

She said: “I am a complete novice – I’ve never been in a recording studio before. It was a completely new experience and it was very surreal sitting there in battle armour. We had such a laugh doing it.”

Starbase 24 has members across South Holland, King’s Lynn and Peterborough and regularly raises cash for Macmillan Cancer Support.

Their next event is a two-day banquet in Northampton this weekend – and they are aiming to beat the £2,000 they raised for the charity with their last banquet.

Charlotte said: “That’s why we dress up, put silly costumes on and make fools of ourselves. I am not a doctor or a nurse or research assistant but there is something I can do. We can make a difference.”

The language guide was launched by London-based Euro Talk last week.