South Holland pride on the road in new arts project

CHANGING CHIMES: The new Chimes sculpture, designed by Essex-born artist Ben Coode Adams and on display at Springfields Festival Gardens.  Photo by Chris Vaughan Photography.
CHANGING CHIMES: The new Chimes sculpture, designed by Essex-born artist Ben Coode Adams and on display at Springfields Festival Gardens. Photo by Chris Vaughan Photography.
  • Fenland Folk and Chimes creations revealed in Spalding

Pioneers in arts, science and business from South Holland can now be seen on roads across the UK and Europe.

Ten pieces of artwork celebrating some of the area’s finest history makers are being carried on FreshLinc lorries after they were recently unveiled in Spalding.

Spalding-born Frank Pick, creator of the map and logo for London Underground, Holbeach-born archaeologist William Stukeley and brewery founder John Molson of Moulton are three of those featured in Fenland Folk.

The artwork, created by Neil Baker and Steven Hatton of Lincoln-based Electric Egg animation and photography, was commissioned by Transported for its Art on Lorries project,

Steve said: “Each artwork celebrates and explores notable figures or events in South Holland and Boston Borough’s past.

“We hope that as these vehicles travel around Europe, they will inspire people to look further into the area’s rich heritage and learn a little more about some of these names.”

FENLAND FOLK: Youngsters and staff from Swineshead St Mary's Primary School view the artwork depicting Donington explorer and navigator Captain Matthew Flinders as part of Transported's Fenland Folk: Art on Lorries project.  Photo by Chris Vaughan Photography.

FENLAND FOLK: Youngsters and staff from Swineshead St Mary's Primary School view the artwork depicting Donington explorer and navigator Captain Matthew Flinders as part of Transported's Fenland Folk: Art on Lorries project. Photo by Chris Vaughan Photography.

Other historic figures celebrated by Fenland Folk are Donington-born explorer Matthew Flinders, the navigator who gave Australia its name and the founder of the Royal College of Nursing, Dame Sarah Swift of Kirton.

Nick Jones, programme director for Transported, said: “The inspiration for each design was chosen by a FreshLinc employee who has been depicted on the rear of the respective trailer, explaining why they chose the person or subject they did.”

“We were delighted to have worked with FreshLinc and their workforce and Springfields Horticultural Society on Fenland Folk.

Meanwhile, a new sculture celebrating characters from south Lincolnshire is on display at Springfields Festival Gardens in Spalding.

We are pleased to welcome this unique piece of physical art into the gardens to to complement the natural, colourful effects we get from our planted landscapes

David Norton, chief executive, Springfields Horticultural Society

The Chimes Sculptures was designed by Essex artist Ben Coode Adams as part of Transported’s work to encourage more people in South Holland to take up arts and crafts.

Springfields Horticultural Society chief executive David Norton said: “We are pleased to welcome this unique piece of physical art into the gardens to to complement the natural, colourful effects we get from our planted landscapes.

“We were particularly pleased to join with Transported to make this specially-commissioned Chimes sculpture more accessible and visible to a wider public audience.

“The historic characters depicted through the Chimes are an indication of the wider influences that have helped shape this area known as South Holland.

“Hopefully the Chimes and the gardens will remain as lasting tributes to the distant and recent past, along with memories of the achievements of those who have helped shape our present and future.”

Mr Jones added: “What the Fenland Folk and Chimes projects have in common is that they both celebrate aspects of what is special about the South Holland and Boston Borough areas, along with its people.

“Both projects bring art to new audiences in Spalding and beyond, offering a fascinating insight into the rich and varied history of the area.”