Town cop pledges ‘robust action’ on domestic abuse

One out of every four assaults reported in South Holland involve domestic abuse, police have revealed.
One out of every four assaults reported in South Holland involve domestic abuse, police have revealed.
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One in every four assaults reported in South Holland involves domestic violence, the area’s police inspector has revealed.

Strong action to protect and support victims has been promised by Insp Jim Tyner after figures from Lincolnshire Police showing that about 1,000 cases of domestic abuse were reported in South Holland between September 2012 to August 2013.

Spalding community policing inspector Jim Tyner.

Spalding community policing inspector Jim Tyner.

Operation NOVA, Say No to Violence and Abuse, has been running in Lincolnshire since February 2010 and has resulted in more than 10,100 reported domestic abuse 
cases across the county 
between September 2012 and August 2013.

Insp Tyner said: “Domestic abuse is a horrible crime that cuts across all social, cultural and religious boundaries.

“Recent data suggests that 25 per cent of all assaults reported in South Holland are domestic-related, but of course this is often a hidden crime which goes unreported and I suspect the number of assaults is even higher.

“In South Holland, every case of domestic abuse is investigated by detectives and I review every case of violence to ensure we are doing everything we can.”

Spalding community policing inspector Jim Tyner.

Spalding community policing inspector Jim Tyner.

The situation in Bourne and The Deepings, part of South Kesteven, is even starker with just over 1,500 reported domestic abuse incidents between September 2012 and August 2013.

Earlier this year, Lincolnshire Police and Crime Commissioner Alan Hardwick announced a new initiative with Lincolnshire County Council to tackle domestic violence by funding a number of projects to help both victims and perpetrators.

Mr Hardwick said: “We both aim to protect and improve the lifestyles enjoyed by residents and by working together on a number of common goals, we can achieve these more effectively.

“By taking a partnership approach, we can also ensure that we are both making the best use of resources and give taxpayers even better value for money.”

Support groups for domestic abuse victims can apply for cash from a Community and Volunteer Fund set up by Mr Hardwick in May so that grants of between £250 and £1,000 can be awarded to crime prevention projects.

Lynn Mithcell, manager of South Holland Women’s Aid, said: “We welcome this initiative so that victims suffering domestic abuse are able to obtain confidential advice and support.”