The Long Sutton pupils for whom caring is normal

Peele Young Carers (from back): Jarred Dean and Jenna Culy, Ellen Debney, Megan-Rose Clark and Tiegan Butcher and (front) Chloe Lay. Photo: SG040215-110TW
Peele Young Carers (from back): Jarred Dean and Jenna Culy, Ellen Debney, Megan-Rose Clark and Tiegan Butcher and (front) Chloe Lay. Photo: SG040215-110TW
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Being a young carer means you can’t get out as much as your friends.

That’s something Jenna Culy (13) has found, and adds: “I don’t like talking about it to them because it’s personal. I don’t want sympathy for it – I have grown up with it from being little.

“This group gives you confidence knowing someone is there for you if you have a problem.”

Megan-Rose Clark (12) values the chance to chat with other young people in a similar situation “instead of keeping it all back”. It also helps to alleviate the isolation of living in a rural area.

Chloe Lay (14) explains why she doesn’t talk with friends about her caring role for both parents.

She says: “It’s personal. You don’t want to spread around what you are doing at home. You don’t want people judging you or looking at you differently.”

If they are different Theresa Earl can see how. She says: “What they do is quite phenomenal. We have kids doing housework and kids with parents who are terminally ill and they are doing a bit of personal care. They are wonderful young people.”

• The school has received the Young Carer Friendly School award.