Take advantage of free blood pressure checks

News from the Lincs Free Press and Spalding Guardian, spaldingtoday.co.uk, @LincsFreePress on Twitter
News from the Lincs Free Press and Spalding Guardian, spaldingtoday.co.uk, @LincsFreePress on Twitter

Doctor Calling: A weekly column by Dr Miles Langdon of South Lincolnshire Clinical Commissioning Group, addressing topical health issues

Patients in South Lincolnshire are being offered free blood pressure checks as part of Know Your Numbers Week from September 15-21.

Visit www.blood

pressureuk.org to find your nearest pressure station. Blood Pressure UK has over 1,000 ‘Pressure Stations’ across the UK offering free blood pressure checks.

More than eight million people in the UK have high blood pressure but are not being treated for it.

The tests, which help patients review whether their blood pressure count is within a normal, high or low range, can play a significant role in reducing harm caused by heart attacks, strokes and other serious health complications resulting from high or low blood pressure.

The checks will be undertaken by fully-qualified staff, with vital follow-up guidance given as necessary. Resources and tips from the British Heart Foundation (BHF) on how to keep your heart healthy by reducing your blood cholesterol, changing diet, keeping active, reducing salt intake and maintaining a healthy weight will also be available. High blood pressure can cause heart attacks, strokes and other serious health problems.

Knowing your blood pressure numbers really does count so I’m urging everyone to get their blood pressure levels tested during Know Your Numbers Week.

An alarming 30 per cent of people in the UK are affected by high blood pressure but most of the time they will not know it. Yet it’s responsible for causing very serious illnesses including heart attacks, which can be fatal.

Having a blood pressure test can also help people to find out whether they have low blood pressure. In general low blood pressure is good news, but in some cases it might be triggered by medicines or a long-term illness such as diabetes.