Spalding yarn bomber’s fun art attack

The gigantic knitted moggy that stands opposite The Vista.
The gigantic knitted moggy that stands opposite The Vista.

A phantom yarn bomber is putting a smile on the faces of passers-by on Spalding’s Churchgate – thanks to woolly ‘statues’ of The Queen and a multi-coloured moggy.

The patriotic, red, white and blue tribute to Queen Elizabeth II stands a mighty 5ft 7in tall close to the pedestrian crossing at the top of Love Lane.

The knitted Queen even features earrings.

The knitted Queen even features earrings.

The boggle-eyed figure is resplendent with a crown, sparkling earrings and a pearl necklace, and has a small toy dog on a lead beside her as well as a string of Union Flags behind.

The larger-than-life cat, which has bright green eyes and a cheeky tongue sticking out, is just opposite The Vista and St Mary and St Nicolas Church. Both figures are created around tree stumps

No-one knows the identity of the knitter or knitters, but people we spoke to thought the figures were fun and brightened the street scene.

Spalding artist Carol Parker has created a few knitted art installations thanks to commissions in the past, but says she’s had nothing to do with the Churchgate figures.

I think it brightens up the place. Somebody may have done it just to lighten people’s day as they go by.

The Rev John Bennett

“Everyone thinks it’s me, but it isn’t,” said Carol. “I don’t know who has done it and I don’t know why they have done it. I can only assume that maybe it’s someone who lives nearby.”

Spalding has seen incidents of yarn bombing, also known as yarn storming or urban knitting, in recent years and this month furtive knitters were out in force decorating a bus shelter and a nearby lamppost in Woodhall Spa.

It’s thought the Queen figure in Spalding was designed as a tribute to our monarch as she celebrated her 90th birthday, but no-one is quite sure why the moggy is there.

Carol says yarn bombing is “quite trendy” at the moment.

This knitted tribute to our monarch stands 5ft 7in tall.

This knitted tribute to our monarch stands 5ft 7in tall.

“Anyone with two needles can do it,” she said. “It’s just amazing that these figures have lasted so long.”

St Mary and St Nicolas Church is the temporary home of a Woolly Spires exhibition, which runs until September, and has four knitted churches on display.

The models feature St Mary and St Nicolas, which Spalding vicar the Rev John Bennett saw in the making at Unique Cottage Studios three or four years ago, Boston Stump, Sleaford’s St Denys Church and St James Church at Louth.

Mr Bennett is impressed by the artistry inside and outside his church. He described the figures in the street as “fun”.

A close-up of the knitted monarch.

A close-up of the knitted monarch.

“I think it brightens up the place,” he said. “Somebody may have done it just to lighten people’s day as they go by.”

The knitted Queen is accompanied by a toy dog on a lead.

The knitted Queen is accompanied by a toy dog on a lead.

This multi-coloured moggy is bringing a smile to the fadces of passers-by.

This multi-coloured moggy is bringing a smile to the fadces of passers-by.