Spalding man prosecuted for lighting infringement in 1916

The menace of Zeppelin bombers was turned to propaganda purposes early in the Great War.
The menace of Zeppelin bombers was turned to propaganda purposes early in the Great War.
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A Zeppelin raid over Lincolnshire and East Anglia a hundred years ago left 12 dead and 33 injured.

Some bombs were dropped which fell in the sea near the shore and others on land, though precise details were not available.

The attack reinforced the necessity of the new lighting regulations.

Among those who fell foul of that law a hundred years ago was Spalding tradesman Albert George Berrill, a draper, of Bridge Street.

He was summoned to the local police court for failing to subdue a light in his dwelling house in Bridge Street, Spalding, contrary to the Lighting Regulations, an offence he admitted. He was fined 40 shillings.

Pc Windley had spotted the light at 6.30pm one Sunday in February and on investigating found there was no blind drawn over the window.

The court heard there had been three previous cautions given by police as a result of lights from Mr Berrill’s premises.

However, Mr Berrill said he had never been personally warned, though his assistants may have been. He assured the court he was “quite anxious to do all he could to screen the lights from his premises”.

When the new regulations came into force in January of 1916 he had all his blinds darkened and had done everything possible to comply.

Mr Berrill said on this occasion his wife had gone into a bedroom in the afternoon and lit the gas to take the chill off the room, and then forgot all about the light. She had just remembered and gone to pull the blind when the policeman called at the house.