Shock absorbers on town bridge ‘shock’

Coun Angela Newton next to one of the new bell bollards on High Bridge, Spalding. Photo:  SG270813-127TW www.spaldingtoday.co.uk/buyaphoto
Coun Angela Newton next to one of the new bell bollards on High Bridge, Spalding. Photo: SG270813-127TW www.spaldingtoday.co.uk/buyaphoto
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They look like objects from a science fiction movie but new shock absorbers installed on Spalding’s High Bridge are the latest additions to the town landscape.

The two “bell bollards” on the 175-year-old bridge were fitted earlier this month after damage caused by lorries turning into London Road and are meant to deflect vehicles away from the bridge itself.

Coun Angela Newton next to one of the new bell bollards on High Bridge, Spalding. 'Photo:  SG270813-128TW www.spaldingtoday.co.uk/buyaphoto

Coun Angela Newton next to one of the new bell bollards on High Bridge, Spalding. 'Photo: SG270813-128TW www.spaldingtoday.co.uk/buyaphoto

But the new bollards seem to have caught out residents who are complaining that they are a hazard, blocking off one side of the bridge to pedestrians.

Rita Taplin (52) of Holland Road, Spalding, said: “The bridge was closed for three days and when it reopened, I drove over it and there appeared to be these two fixed bollards that appeared at either end of it.

“It was a little bit of a shock and whilst I understand they were put there because the bridge had been weakened by accidents, to block off the pavement seems absolutely ludicrous.”

Spalding county councillor Angela Newton said: “When I saw them, I was amazed how big they were and I can’t think why they have blocked off the pavement when quite a lot of people walk along there.”

Andrew Antcliff, senior engineer at Lincolnshire County Council, said: “There have been a number of occasions when HGV trailers have hit the bridge whilst turning onto it.

“These new bell bollards will protect this important bridge from accident damage for many years to come.”