Shaping up for a good education

The question is 64 divided by 8 and Jamie Coe (right) has his finger on the stop watch to check how swiftly Sean Gent comes up with the answer. Photo: SG290911-120NG

The question is 64 divided by 8 and Jamie Coe (right) has his finger on the stop watch to check how swiftly Sean Gent comes up with the answer. Photo: SG290911-120NG

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IF YOU can’t tell your nonagon from your heptagon, just ask youngsters at Gedney Drove End Primary School!

The young pupils have a thorough understanding of some complicated shapes, their names and how to work out their perimeters, thanks to inspired maths teacher Louise West. The youngsters in Years 4, 5 and 6 in her class were thinking about the perimeters of a shape and using multiplication and division to work out the length of one edge and the entire perimeter of any given regular shape.

Gedney Drove End Primary'School days feature'Names: Paige Taylor

Gedney Drove End Primary'School days feature'Names: Paige Taylor

Ms West had put some shapes up on the board and asked the children to work out the length of one edge of a pentagon that had a perimeter of 45cm: there was a chorus of 9cm followed by silent clapping.

There are just 36 children at the school, split into three classes, and Years 2 and 3 were working on instructions during our visit. They had joined up with pupils from their federated school at Holbeach St Marks the previous week to build dens and were writing instructions on how to make a shelter with teacher Julie Simons. They were using photographs of their dens to help them organise the instructions – and were persuaded to continue their studies inside a tent within the classroom for our photograph!

Finally, the Reception/Year 1 children were also looking at shapes, simple shapes in three dimensions this time, and were matching shapes to pictures and words, while the younger children were enjoying free-flow play both inside and outside, where there was sand, water, a play house and a little garden.