Quadring church back in business

Early Years Foundation Stage at Quadring: back ( from left) - Matilda Buck, nursery nurse Jane Devine, Bobbie Jack-Baxter, Dima Kostromejevas, leader Anneka Luffman; front  Anastisija Jefimora, Mason Hibbitt, Alice Lorimer. Photo: SG250413-115TW
Early Years Foundation Stage at Quadring: back ( from left) - Matilda Buck, nursery nurse Jane Devine, Bobbie Jack-Baxter, Dima Kostromejevas, leader Anneka Luffman; front Anastisija Jefimora, Mason Hibbitt, Alice Lorimer. Photo: SG250413-115TW

Quadring’s church is back in business after a year of disruption caused by thieves who stole the lead off the roof.

The Rev Ian Walters says that caused all kinds of problems for the congregation of St Margaret’s, a Grade 1 listed building. For instance, he cites the funeral that took place with a wet floor because it was pouring with rain.

However, there was an upside for some worshippers, as services were held in the village hall, which is far more central to the village.

Mr Walters shares two theories he has been told by a local farmer about why the church and school are quarter of a mile away from the village. Apparently, it was common for plague-hit villages to start building homes away from the centre. Alternatively, he says the main road from Spalding to Donington moved and that resulted in houses being built closer to the new road and away from the church.

Whichever is the truth, Cowley and Brown’s Primary School takes advantage of the church’s proximity for end of term assemblies and other special events.

The church organises other events for locals, such as the successful weekly mothers and toddlers and monthly messy church. In addition to that, the village Evergreen Club for retired folk meets in the hall regularly and Mr Walters says Tuesday night bingo is always a great success, as are the quizzes run in the hall by church treasurer Ann Harvey.

The school has some particularly little newcomers this year since The Orchard opened. The Early Years Foundation Stage Unit takes nursery children the term following their third birthday. Headteacher Nicola Wilkinson says 16 nursery children spend mornings in the unit run by EYFS leader Anneka Luffman and nursery nurse Jane Devine.

The school has been developing the outdoor learning area for pupils and now, in addition to a nature reserve, has a poly tunnel containing a wormery, and outdoor musical instruments which were added to the existing trim trail and tyre play system.

Nicola said: “What I wanted was an outdoor classroom for the children, somewhere they can go from one activity to another, so it could be physical or scientific or a combination of both. Outdoor learning is important. The biggest world is not between four walls.”