Pinchbeck dig site slowly revealing its past

Spalding Grammar School student Casey Nurse in a trench at the Pinchbeck dig.
Spalding Grammar School student Casey Nurse in a trench at the Pinchbeck dig.
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The site for the dig, off Herring Lane in Pinchbeck, was first discovered by local landowner Ivan Healey, when as a young boy he noticed a stone wall at the base of a drain that had just been cleaned.

Nothing further happened for many years, until John Lyon and his company MJL Skipmaster became involved, John metal detecting the field with the late Alex Tyler, and financing further surveys of the field.

Research has uncovered links between the site and a man who John describes as once being “the second most powerful man in England”.

Humphrey de Bohun, once the Constable of England and married to Elizabeth, the daughter of King Edward 1, owned a manor at Pinchbeck in the 14th century. A licence for a market and fair had been granted in 1318 and the large quantity of coins recovered by metal detector prior to excavations began suggest the site was the market place.

John, who says items that only a knight would have used have been uncovered over the years, said: “Humphrey de Bohun was the lord of the manor, but we wanted to know where the occupation was.”