Treasure final weeks at school

Finn Toomey and Ronnie Smith, pupils from Ayscoughfee Hall School's end of year production, playing the Sheriff of Nottingham and King John, respectively. EMN-151007-121012001
Finn Toomey and Ronnie Smith, pupils from Ayscoughfee Hall School's end of year production, playing the Sheriff of Nottingham and King John, respectively. EMN-151007-121012001
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Trish Takes Five: By blogger Trish Burgess

One of the most rewarding aspects of being a school governor is attending productions performed by the children.

A stoat wearing camouflage trousers and wielding a sword

I have been a governor at Ayscoughfee Hall School for 10 years now and even though my own son, Rory, left the school several years ago, it is not something I have thought of giving up just yet.

Last week, I sat in the audience to watch the end-of-year play, the thoroughly entertaining Robin and the Sherwood Hoodies, a relatively new show for children from the excellent Musicline company.

All of the junior children were involved but it was the outgoing Year 6 pupils who took the starring roles. And, wow, did they shine.

Having watched these children grow over the years, it was a real pleasure to see how confident they had become and how much they enjoyed making an audience laugh and cheer.

As I sat in the hall watching the performance, it seemed like only yesterday that Rory’s class took to the stage to perform Hagbane’s Doom at the end of their time at primary school.

Rory played the part of Aldred, commander-in-chief of the forest folk and, incidentally, a stoat, although a stoat wearing camouflage trousers and wielding a sword. He had come a long way from being a fidgety shepherd in his first nativity play.

A lot of the parents in the hall last week were probably a bit teary-eyed, realising that this was the end of an era.

The move from primary to secondary school is such a huge leap and, whereas the children often seem to take it all in their stride, mothers and fathers are anxious about the change.

Having been through it, it is true that your involvement in your child’s education will shift. No longer are you standing at the school gates, chatting with other mums and dads.

Rory took the bus to school from the beginning of Year 7 and, straight away, I felt cut off.

When your child is in primary school, you know all the teachers and other parents: in secondary education, you may feel like you are on the sidelines, unless you pitch in straight away with PTFA involvement.

In some ways, taking a step back can be a good thing. I was probably a constant presence during my son’s primary school days, but allowed him the freedom to make his own way, without my interference, once he reached Spalding Grammar School.

To all those parents watching their Year 6 children in their final weeks at school, whether they are involved in plays or sporting events, I would say take lots of photographs and make memories of this special time.

Once they start ‘big school’, the years will go so quickly that time will slip through your fingers and soon they will be gone, off to pastures new, leaving you with the photographs and the memories of a time when you were at the heart of their world.

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